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Michigan Students Connect Clinics With Supplies

PHOTO: Members of the Medical Outreach Group load up a trailer with the supplies and equipment they've collected that will be distributed to clinics that serve low-income patients. Photo courtesy of Andrew Michail.
PHOTO: Members of the Medical Outreach Group load up a trailer with the supplies and equipment they've collected that will be distributed to clinics that serve low-income patients. Photo courtesy of Andrew Michail.
January 23, 2014

DETROIT – A group of Michigan college students is out to prove that young people really can change the world, as they work to connect clinics that serve low-income patients with much-needed medical supplies from local hospitals and physicians.

Andrew Michail, 20, is studying to be a doctor, but he's not waiting until graduation to make a difference.

As founder and CEO of the Medical Outreach Group, Michail and his nonprofit organization are dedicated to collecting old or unused medical equipment for use in Michigan clinics that serve the needy.

"I do think that teens and young adults our age have lost touch with, number one, community, and number two, donations,” he maintains. “The world we live in today has become very self-centered. Everyone is about me, me, me."

In the past year, the Medical Outreach Group has collected more than $130,000 worth of donations and provided supplies to 10 different metro Detroit clinics.

Hospitals or private practices with extra equipment or clinics in need of supplies can find out more at MedicalOutreachGroup.org.

Michail says he was inspired to start the organization after volunteering in a Detroit clinic that lacked basic equipment such as wheelchairs, walkers and even exam tables.

He also says he was moved to action by what he describes as a lack of altruism in some of his classmates.

"I think a lot of pre-med students these days are just going to pursue the health industry due to their income levels they will probably receive and also because their parents want them to go into that field,” he explains. “It's not something they love to do, helping people. "

The Medical Outreach Group is run entirely by students from various southeast Michigan colleges and universities.

Mona Shand, Public News Service - MI