PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 18, 2021 


President Biden just signed a law declaring Juneteenth a federal holiday; and the first tropical storm system is forecast to make landfall in U.S. by end of the week.


2021Talks - June 18, 2021 


The U.S. marks a new national holiday; Republicans reject Sen. Joe Manchin's election reform compromise; and U.S. Supreme Court upholds Obamacare but strikes a blow to equal rights.

Vancouver Businesses Cite "Oil Train Economics" for Opposing Terminal

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

A small-business coalition says building a large oil-by-rail terminal at the Port of Vancouver would change the city's character and culture, and end up costing more jobs than it creates. Credit: Washington Department of Transportation.
A small-business coalition says building a large oil-by-rail terminal at the Port of Vancouver would change the city's character and culture, and end up costing more jobs than it creates. Credit: Washington Department of Transportation.
 By Chris ThomasContact
August 19, 2015

VANCOUVER, Wash. - Small businesses in Vancouver say the city is becoming its own economic powerhouse and doesn't need an oil-shipping terminal to create jobs.

Members of the group "Vancouver 101" estimate that if only one in 30 businesses now in the area moves or closes because of a proposed Tesoro-Savage oil terminal being built, and others decide not to locate in Vancouver, job loss soon would outweigh oil-terminal jobs by 16 to one.

Auto-shop owner Don George said it isn't as much an official survey as a common-sense prediction.

"If we lose a few of those businesses each year," he said, "this is projected on no spills. This is projected on no accidents. This is projected on people deciding that being next to the biggest oil terminal in North America is not an attractive proposition."

According to the Port of Vancouver, its responsibility is to produce tax revenue and jobs on the property in marine and industrial development, and the state's Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council has dragged its feet in the review process. The draft Environmental Impact Statement for the oil terminal is expected in November.

The delays have given local business owners time to organize and share their concerns about oil-by-rail safety, the environment and property values. But Hector Hinojosa, a restaurateur and caterer, said that for most, it's a matter of supporting what will bring in the most customers and add to the downtown culture and character rather than changing it.

"It's better for us to have a waterfront project that is attractive, so the oil terminal doesn't make any kind of economic sense for us," he said. "So, just strictly a financial aspect for me, oil terminal doesn't do anything for my business."

Vancouver 101 pointed to waterfront development plans geared for customers rather than oil tankers as its preferred alternative. The cities of Vancouver and Washougal also are on record as opposing the oil-terminal plans.

Best Practices