Sunday, January 16, 2022

Play

A new survey shows discrimination in medical settings affects quality of care; U.S. Supreme Court rejects vaccine and testing mandates for businesses; and New York moves toward electric school buses.

Play

U.S. House passes a new voting rights bill, setting up a Senate showdown; President Biden announces expanded COVID testing, and Jan. 6 Committee requests an interview with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy.

Play

New website profiles missing and murdered Native Americans; more support for young, rural Minnesotans who've traded sex for food, shelter, drugs or alcohol; more communities step up to solve "period poverty;" and find your local gardener - Jan. 29 is National Seed Swap Day.

New Legislation Expands Health-Insurance Access to Pregnant New Yorkers

Play

Wednesday, December 30, 2015   

ALBANY, N.Y. - Beginning Friday, pregnant New Yorkers can enroll in the state's health-insurance exchange at any time during their pregnancy.

Enrollment is usually only available during the period of October through December. But new legislation, co-sponsored by Assemblywoman Aravella Simotas, D-Queens, makes New York the first state in the nation where pregnancy is a "qualifying life event" that allows pregnant women to obtain health insurance and prenatal care at any time through the exchange; something Simotas says is crucial for a baby's development.

"It was mind-boggling to me that New York State and states throughout the nation would allow a woman giving birth to get insurance, but they wouldn't cover her while she was pregnant," says Simotas. "Why should a child be born into this world prematurely if it can be avoided?"

Simotas says the insurance industry was resistant to the legislation because of fears that expanding the list of health conditions that allow people to enroll outside of the designated period could cut into profits. Simotas says that's simply not true.

"The research is clear that a child that is born healthy costs insurance companies a lot less than a child that's born prematurely," she says. "It makes more economic sense to provide a mother, who may have issues during her pregnancy, with prenatal care."

Under the law, insurance coverage for a pregnant woman would be effective beginning the first day of the month in which the woman is certified as pregnant.


get more stories like this via email

Emissions from all buses, cars, and trucks make up 30% of New York City's carbon footprint. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

In her 2022 State of the State address, New York Gov. Kathy Hochul set new goals for electrifying the school bus fleets in the state. Clean-energy …


Social Issues

Finding and affording child care is no cakewalk for Oregon families right now. A new report details the pressures and some potential policy fixes…

Social Issues

Acknowledging the pandemic's toll on Kentucky students, teachers and families, Gov. Andy Beshear announced last night a state budget which would make …


Pennsylvania's Public Safety Answering Points process an estimated 14.5 million requests for emergency services every year. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

Mobile carriers are starting to decommission their 3G cellular networks this year, some as soon as next month. Pennsylvania officials are reminding …

Environment

One hundred years ago today, the Izaak Walton League of America was founded in Chicago, with a mission of local stewardship of wild places, citizen …

Arizona environmental and political leaders are pushing state legislators to pass measures that would move the state's power grid to renewable sources of energy. (andreiorlov/Adobe Stock)

Environment

An alliance of environmental groups and lawmakers has released an ambitious, wide-ranging set of goals for the 2022 Arizona Legislature. The …

Social Issues

During Wisconsin's pandemic elections, absentee ballot drop boxes offered a different route for people to cast their votes, but a new decision in …

Social Issues

The road to voting rights for Native Americans has been long, but advocates for indigenous people hope to build on the momentum they've seen in …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021