Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 13, 2019 


Public impeachment hearings in Washington; dreamers protest in Texas; roadless wilderness areas possibly at risk around the country; and an ozone indicating garden, at the North Carolina Governor's Mansion.

2020Talks - November 13, 2019 


Supreme Court hears DACA arguments, and likely will side with the Trump administration, but doesn't take up a gun manufacturer's appeal. Former SC Gov. Mark Sanford drops out of presidential race; and former President Jimmy Carter recovers from brain surgery.

Daily Newscasts

Gulf Dead Zone Traced Back to Iowa Farm Fields

October 15, 2008

Ames, IA - Hypoxia may be hard to pronounce, but it is even harder to live with. Hypoxia refers to a situation when the oxygen level in water is so low that neither plants nor fish can survive. Each year, the hypoxia dead zone around the mouth of the Mississippi River in the Gulf of Mexico grows larger. Scientists attribute hypoxia to the excessive runoff of nitrogen- and phosphorus-based fertilizers.

A conference today in Ames will focus on cost-effective solutions to this serious problem. Conference organizer Catherine Kling is a professor of Environmental and Resource Economics at Iowa State University. She says the source of the runoff is close to home.

"When you look at maps that identify the sources of the nutrients that are the key problem, Iowa and Illinois are definitely part of the target. We must focus here to make any real progress."

Kling says the conference will feature experts from universities, federal and state agencies, and environmental experts with practical answers.

"The solutions are to manage nutrients better and properly time fertilizer applications, as well as to look at placing wetlands in locations where they can really do the most good."

Kling says the key to reducing the toxic runoff is making the solutions economically practical for farmers, so yield and profits are not compromised.

Dick Layman/Craig Eicher, Public News Service - IA