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As climate change conference opens, one CA city takes action; Israel and Hamas extend Gaza truce by one day in a last-minute deal; WV could lose hundreds of millions in Medicaid funding.

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An expulsion vote looms for Rep. George Santos, the Ohio Supreme Court dismisses lawsuits against district maps and the Supreme Court hears a case which could cut the power of federal agencies.

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Congress has iced the Farm Bill, but farmer advocates argue some portions are urgent, the Hoosier State is reaping big rewards from wind and solar, and opponents react to a road through Alaska's Brooks Range, long a dream destination for hunters and anglers.

Documents Show Coal Industry Knew Climate Impacts in 1960s

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Thursday, December 5, 2019   

LINCOLN, Neb. – As court proceedings continue against ExxonMobil on claims the company misled investors about the risks of climate change, a recently discovered journal suggests the coal industry knew about the potentially catastrophic impacts of burning coal as early as 1966.

Christopher Cherry, a civil engineering professor at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville who found the industry journal, says he was surprised by how clearly executives understood how CO2 emissions were linked to climate change.

"Talking about changes in temperature causing polar ice caps, inundation of cities like New York and London,” he points out. “In one paragraph they basically summarized what we've been observing, and what scientists have been describing was going to happen, but they did it back in the '60s, 50 years ago."

Also in the journal, an engineer from Peabody Coal pointed out that the industry was "buying time" until federal air pollution protections were introduced, after the 1963 Clean Air Act.

The first federal regulations for CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants did not come until 2015, and were repealed in 2017.

Peabody has responded to the findings, acknowledging fossil fuels' role in climate change and promising to advance technologies to reach its goal of near-zero emissions.

Cherry notes that just a few years ago, Peabody's position on climate change was denial and obfuscation.

"At the end of the day I don't hold a lot of hope or trust in a company that has been denying evidence of climate change for the last few decades, obviously now almost half century," he states.

Cherry wasn't researching coal complicity in climate change. He says he stopped a colleague carrying old library volumes to the recycling bin when he saw the 1966 Mining Congress Journal, mainly as a gift for his wife, whose parents were in the mining industry.


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