PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - February 24, 2021 


Questions about proper notification in a shift to all-COVID nursing homes; Texas lawmakers launch probe into power outages for millions.


2021Talks - February 24, 2021 


U.S. and Canada plot a partnership for the future; faulty intelligence blamed for security failures at U.S. Capitol; and hearings continue for top spots in Biden administration.

Despite Disappointment, TX Dems Stoked for Future Election Gains

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

In Texas, at least 66% of the 17 million registered voters cast ballots in the 2020 general election. That's 6.6 percentage points higher than total turnout in 2016. (12019/Pixabay)
In Texas, at least 66% of the 17 million registered voters cast ballots in the 2020 general election. That's 6.6 percentage points higher than total turnout in 2016. (12019/Pixabay)
November 25, 2020

AUSTIN, Texas - In the days leading up to the November 3 election, political pundits saw signs the historically red state of Texas might vote for Joe Biden. That didn't happen, but Democrats say they're optimistic about a turnaround in 2024.

While Democrats gained ground in some cities and suburbs, President Donald Trump won Texas by roughly the same percentage of votes as in 2016.

Claude Cummings, vice president of Houston's District 6 of the Communications Workers of America, said voters in most large metropolitan areas voted Democrats into office, but more field work is needed in smaller communities to reach Black and Latino voters.

"As bad we felt about not delivering Texas to the Biden-Harris ticket, because we really thought we close enough to do that, the good news is we still flipped some more counties to blue," said Cummings.

Cummings said the CWA did more with its labor partners than ever before - spending money on radio, phone banking, door knocking and direct mail. But the pandemic prevented face-to-face conversations with potential voters.

Derrick Osobase is the Texas state campaign coordinator for the CWA in Austin, and said exit polls showed voters related most to the messaging about financial stability and security.

"We feel like our program has been effective," said Osobase. "Because we really lead with a working-class message around good jobs, about regulation of companies. We were able to lead on issues - how to put people back to work."

Texas has 254 counties, and Cummings said to capture more of the vote share in 2024, Democrats need to bring their message to smaller counties where political activism may be lacking.

"There's no Democratic candidates running, there's no Democratic presence," said Cummings. "So, we're going to have a very difficult time winning statewide offices unless the same infrastructure that we helped build into the larger counties are built into the smaller counties."

Cummings added that despite being smaller than many other unions, and with many of its members out of work and staff laid off, the Communication Workers' canvassing operation was the largest of any union during the election.

Disclosure: Communications Workers of America contributes to our fund for reporting on Human Rights/Racial Justice, Livable Wages/Working Families. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.
Roz Brown, Public News Service - TX