Tuesday, February 7, 2023

Play

Bill to expand tax credits draws on children's health data, Alaskans file petition opposing giant grocery merger, and a revised Colorado water plan prioritizes conservation.

Play

President Biden is set to give the State of the Union address, House Speaker Kevin McCarthy calls the national debt limit the United States' greatest threat, and Kamala Harris announces new pledges to offer more economic stability in Central America.

Play

Is bird flu, inflation or price gouging to blame for astronomical egg prices? Pregnancy can be life-changing or life-ending depending on where you live, and nine tribal schools are transforming their outdoor spaces into community gathering areas.

Groups, Cities Fight Bills to Speed 5G Wireless Broadband Expansion

Play

Wednesday, June 2, 2021   

SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Community activists are urging California lawmakers to reject two bills that would limit local control in order to clear the way for 5G small-cell wireless equipment near homes, schools and businesses.

Supporters of the bills have cited the economic benefits of improved high-speed broadband. However, multiple cities are fighting the 5G rollout, citing concerns about health, safety and property values.

Doug Wood, founder and director of the nonprofit Americans for Responsible Technology, opposes both bills.

"It gives the telecoms free rein to install this equipment pretty much wherever they want, and puts unreasonable time limits on a city's permitting process," he said. "The only people benefiting from these bills are the telecoms, not Californians."

Senate Bill 556 would require municipalities to make space available at low rates for communications service providers. It passed the Senate and is now in two Assembly committees. And Assembly Bill 537 would force cities to go to court if they want to deny a permit for a location. It has passed in several Assembly committees with bipartisan support.

The telecom companies have argued that installing 5G statewide will give low-income communities a leg up. But Larry Ortega, with the nonprofit Community Union, said wired municipal broadband is a better option. He added that these bills do nothing to address cost to the consumer.

"You know, many of our kids are not going to afford 5G," he said, "so, there's going to be an increase in cost, which is the primary barrier in the digital divide."

In terms of health concerns, a 2018 study from the National Institutes of Health found radio frequency radiation - used in cell phones and 5G antennas - caused heart and brain tumors in male rats. However, the Federal Communications Commission has declared cell phones safe. Detractors say the standards the FCC used to make that determination are decades-old and flawed.


get more stories like this via email
As many as 11% of eligible voters do not have the kind of identification that is required by states with strict ID requirements, according to the Brennan Center for Justice. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

Secretary of State Shenna Bellows said a bill to require Maine voters to present photo identification in order to cast ballots is unnecessary and coul…


Social Issues

A bill to increase tax credits in the Commonwealth is backed up by research showing the credits lead to better nutrition for working families and bett…

Environment

Part of the deal Wyoming struck for sending its water down the Colorado River was that state residents would be able to tap electricity generated at G…


Advocates and activists from both the liberal and conservative sides are trying to encourage voter turnout for the upcoming state Supreme Court race, given the impact the outcome will have on the court's ideological balance. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

Wisconsin's primary election is two weeks away, and a high-profile state Supreme Court race is on the ballot. Several advocacy groups are behind a …

Environment

A coalition of conservation groups is giving Colorado's revised state water plan a thumbs-up for its increased focus on protecting Colorado's rivers…

More than half of U.S. adults (51%) now consider a college education to be "very important," down from 70% in 2013, according to a 2019 Gallup poll. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

West Virginia is among a handful of states with the highest increases in educational attainment between 2019 and 2021, according to a new report from …

Social Issues

The state's "divisive concepts" law is preventing educators from holding rational discussions about race relations in America, New Hampshire civil …

Social Issues

Pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly has announced a $450 million investment in North Carolina's Research Triangle Park to develop new drugs, and put more …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021