Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 18, 2018 


Trump now says he misspoke as he stood side by side with Putin. Also on the Wednesday rundown: a Senate committee looks to weaken the Endangered Species Act; and public input is being sought on Great Lakes restoration.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - AR: Rural/Farming

The average worker bee produces only about one-twelfth teaspoon of honey in its lifetime. (U.S. Dept. of Agriculture/Flickr)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — Arkansas beekeepers may be hearing less buzz from their hives this spring. A new survey by the Bee Informed Partnership found that beekeepers reported a 40 percent bee colony loss in the last year. A typical colony loss is less than half that, year over year, and advocate

Dozens of migratory waterfowl and other species, many of them endangered, can be found at the Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuge in Central Arkansas. (USFWS)

CLARKEDALE, Ark. – Commercial farms leased in many national wildlife refuges, including several in Arkansas, have been sprayed with nearly a half million pounds of toxic pesticides. According to a report by the Center for Biological Diversity, the refuges are fragile environments that are ho

Arkansas ranks ninth in the nation in the value of grain sorghum produced annually, exporting the majority of it to China. (Arkansas Farm Bureau)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – If President Donald Trump's tariffs on steel and aluminum imports start a trade war, Arkansas could take an almost $400 million hit to its economy. Agricultural economists at the University of Arkansas say if the state's major trading partners retaliate with similar impor

Soybeans are Arkansasís largest agricultural export, but a labeling change proposed by the FDA could affect sales. (photokostic/GettyImages)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- Soybeans and soybean products are Arkansas's largest agricultural export, but a planned rule change by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration could put a dent in future crops. The FDA is proposing a new policy that would mean companies could no longer make claims that soy prote

Poultry processing is a $4 billion a year industry in Arkansas, employing more than 40,000 people. (nd3000/iStockphoto)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- A coalition of environmental and animal rights groups is asking for a moratorium on constructing new chicken processing farms in northeast Arkansas. The Animal Legal Defense Fund, the Arkansas Rights Koalition and the Center for Biological Diversity are among the groups asking

Arkansas plans to triple the number of medical-school graduates in the next few years to help reduce a shortage of doctors in the state. (DmitriKotin/iStockphoto)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Public health officials say they are making progress in reducing a chronic doctor shortage in Arkansas, particularly in rural counties. And the need is great: Arkansas currently has the lowest ratio of physicians per capita and its population is ranked among the unhealthies

A couple of groups have come forward in opposition to six large broiler chicken houses proposed for the Strawberry River Watershed. (univar.edu)

EVENING SHADE, Ark. – A lawsuit could be filed before summer wraps up over plans to build a new poultry plant in Northeast Arkansas. The Animal Legal Defense Fund and the Arkansas Rights Koalition (ARK) have sent a letter to the Farm Service Agency, the Small Business Administration and the

Harmful blue-green algae is increasing in bodies of water across the country because of climate change, farming practices and storm and wastewater runoff. (USGS)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Algal blooms in bodies of water across the nation are increasing as a result of climate change, farming practices, storm and wastewater runoff and other environmental issues. They're naturally occurring, but produce toxins that get into the air, water or food, and can cau

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