Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - February 20, 2020 


Six Democratic presidential contenders face off in Nevada; and ballot security issues in play.

2020Talks - February 19, 2020 


Tonight's the Las Vegas debate, ahead of this weekend's Nevada caucuses. Some candidates are trying to regain the spotlight and others are trying to keep momentum.

Public News Service - AR: Civic Engagement

GRAPHIC: The Arkansas Secretary of State's office lists the kinds of IDs that a voter must have to vote. Graphic from the Secretary of State's website.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Confusion caused by Arkansas's voter ID law might mean serious problems as folks go to the polls for the primary. Last year's law requires Arkansans to present a photo ID to vote. But it's under a legal cloud, and as with similar laws in other states, may be ruled uncons

According to the Center for Responsive Politics, the level of dark money going into U.S. elections is exploding. GRAPH by the center.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - A mudslide of dark money pouring into Arkansas elections is changing the state's politics for the worse, according to watchdogs and lawmakers. A rural state with inexpensive advertising, Arkansas used to have relatively low-cost elections. But according to state Senator Joyce Ell

Leticia Reta is an undocumented immigrant living in Little Rock. She says for many years she was married to a man who beat her, but was afraid to leave because he threatened to have her deported. PHOTO courtesy of Reta.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - There are a lot of immigrant women in the United States who are abused, but afraid to say anything because they could be deported. Leticia Reta of Little Rock used to be one of those women, but she's not any more. Reta came to the U.S. two decades ago, and for years was married

Supporters say immigration reform would help not only the migrant families, but would also boost the state's economy. PHOTO courtesy of Arkansas Advocates for Children & Families.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - Supporters of immigration reform say it would not only help the Arkansas economy, it would also bring in millions more in state and local taxes. According to the non-partisan, non-profit Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, Arkansas already collects more than $70 million a

PHOTO: Many immigrants say they'd be willing to follow the rigorous process outlined in the

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - Arkansas' U.S. senators may be split on the immigration reform legislation up for debate in the Senate - but voters in the state, not so much. In a new poll, 67 percent of them support the Senate bill (S 744) crafted by the bipartisan "Gang of Eight," and there were similar resu

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