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PNS Daily Newscast - March 8, 2021 


Nationwide protests in advance of trial of former Minneapolis police officer charged in the killing of George Floyd; judicial districts amendment faces bipartisan skepticism in PA.


2021Talks - March 8, 2021 


After a whirlwind voting session the Senate approves $1.9 Trillion COVID relief bill, President Biden signs an executive order to expand voting access and the president plans a news conference this month.

Public News Service - AZ: Rural/Farming

The Central Arizona Project uses a network of hundreds of miles of pipelines and canals to distribute water from the Colorado River Basin to customers across the state. (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation)

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PHOENIX, Ariz. -- The Colorado River is the lifeblood of the American West, but the viability of the massive river basin is being threatened by climate change. To plan future water use in the region -- which includes Arizona -- the Central Arizona Project is teaming up with NASA and Arizona State

The Copper Queen Community Hospital, in the mining town of Bisbee in Cochise County, is one of dozens of health-care facilities that serve residents of rural Arizona. (Copper Queen Hospital)

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TUCSON, Ariz. -- While Arizona isn't seeing the surge or "second wave" of COVID-19 cases occurring in other states, public-health officials here are concerned cases could rise again. Epidemiologists say some rural regions of the state haven't fully recovered from the first wave and could be hit mu

Crews fighting wildfires will have to add social distancing and sanitizing equipment to their skill set in order to battle blazes this year. (bekireveren/Adobe Stock)<br /><br />

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CAVE CREEK, Ariz. - Fighting wildfires in Arizona and across the West is a daunting task in a normal year. But add the new coronavirus into the mix, and emergency officials say they've had to develop a brand-new game plan. The Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management and the American Red

Almost 1 million Arizonans lack access to high-speed internet service, but state officials hope a grant program will help close that digital divide. (Funtap/Adobe Stock) <br /><br />

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MOHAVE VALLEY, Ariz. - Most people don't think twice about logging onto the internet to take an online class or watch a movie - but for almost a million Arizonans, that's a near impossibility. For rural areas or poor neighborhoods, affordable broadband internet service often is unavailable. The S

A school bus transports students through the Navajo Nation on U.S. Highway 89 in northern Arizona. Bus routes in rural school districts often cover more than 100 miles a day picking up and dropping off students. (Savola/Adobe Stock)

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COTTONWOOD, Ariz. — Out in Arizona's wide-open spaces, dozens of rural school districts are struggling to serve their communities and often are challenged just to keep the doors open. A recent report by The Rural School and Community Trust found rural schools in Arizona and across the country

Fannie Shorthair stands in front of her house in the Navajo Nation, which has been without electric power for her entire life. (Salt River Project)

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WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. – Crews from the Salt River Project and other power utilities are leaving this weekend to install electric power for the first time to thousands of homes in the Navajo Nation. The effort, known as "Light Up Navajo," will wire more than 15,000 homes in northeast Arizona and

A study of Arizona third graders finds that students who live in poverty or attend rural schools face the biggest obstacle to attaining age-appropriate literacy. (smgu3/Twenty20)
Available In Spanish

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PHOENIX — A study of literacy programs for Arizona third-graders found that children who live in poverty or attend rural schools are at a disadvantage in learning to read. The report evaluated how effective reading instruction programs were for third-grade students based on a number of key m

A new report finds that more problems with the food supply are getting past federal inspectors. (FDA)

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PHOENIX – A new report concludes that federal health officials need to do more to protect the U.S. food supply. According to the report from the Arizona Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) Education Fund, the number of recalls for tainted food increased between 2013 and 2018, with recalls

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