Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 3, 2020 


Economists say coronavirus disaster declarations may be the quickest path to reopening; militia groups use virus, Independence Day to recruit followers.

2020Talks - July 3, 2020 


Trump visits South Dakota's Black Hills, Mt. Rushmore today; nearby tribal leaders object, citing concerns over COVID-19 and a fireworks display. Plus, voter registration numbers are down from this time in 2016.

Public News Service - CA: Livable Wages/Working Families

California ranks 36th in the nation for quality of education. (Andy Dean/iStockphoto)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California schools have far too few teachers and other adults on K-12 campuses, and children’s education is suffering. That’s according to a new report from the nonprofit group Children Now. Researchers compared a typical high school, Gunderson High in San Jo

The Skaggs family of Rancho Cucamonga had to get by without paid family leave when their daughter and newborn son became gravely ill. (Rob Skaggs)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A group of "dadvocates" from California and around the country will converge on Washington, D.C., today, meeting with lawmakers to press for federal paid family leave. As things stand, when a child is born or a family member is sick, in most states companies do not have

Most of California's 300,000 teachers are not part of the state disability insurance system, and do not receive automatic paid maternity leave. (VadimGuzhva/Adobestock)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Teachers are speaking out in favor of a bill that would grant them and other classified employees six weeks of paid time off for pregnancy, miscarriage, childbirth and recovery. Many of these educators have to use their sick time because they don't pay into the state dis

Public banks in Germany have been credited with fueling that nation's green economy.(RLTheis/Twenty20)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – California may have a new type of bank by next year – the result of a bill signed yesterday by Gov. Gavin Newsom that sets up rules for the creation of public banks. The new financial institutions would be owned by and would primarily serve public agencies –

Tourism to the U.S. from Mexico and China are down this year. (Scott S./Morguefile)

LOS ANGELES � For travelers from other countries looking for vacation spots, the United States may no longer be top of mind. A new report blames President Donald Trump's policies for hurting international tourism to the U.S. The study cited what it called the �Tru

Long-beaked common dolphins are one species often caught in drift gillnets, which are being replaced on the West Coast with safer fishing gear. (Chad King/NOAA)

LONG BEACH, Calif. - Dolphins, whales, sharks and sea lions on the West Coast may be less likely to die in fishing nets now that authorities have approved a new type of fishing gear. The Pacific Fishery Management Council voted Tuesday to approve deep-set buoy gear to replace the huge drift gillnets

Tens of thousands of workers in California could be affected by AB 5, including app-based service drivers, nail salon workers, couriers, construction workers and janitors. (David P. Whelan/Morguefile)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Uber and Lyft drivers and their allies in the labor movement are urging Gov. Gavin Newsom to sign a bill – AB 5 – passed Wednesday that reclassifies tens of thousands of contract workers as employees. The measure could give the employees access to minimum wag

A new study shows that teachers continue to leave the profession faster than they can be replaced. (szepy/iStockphoto)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — In California and across the nation, districts are struggling to hire enough teachers. And the shortage is getting worse, according to a new report. There remains a supply gap of about 110,000 teachers nationwide as of last school year, primarily because more teachers ar

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