Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast-February 18, 2019 


Conservative news outlets call the Trump administration out on its “national emergency” declaration for the border wall. A statewide retirement savings plan heads to the Colorado Legislature. Plus, a report on a “renaissance” in less-intrusive cardiac care.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CA: Rural/Farming

Environmental advocates are pushing for more zero-emissions vehicles and changes to the EPA's Regional Haze Program in the wake of a new report that gives California national parks like Joshua Tree failing grades for air quality. Credit: Tommy Hough.

JOSHUA TREE, Calif. – As smoke from multiple wildfires chokes the air across California this summer, air quality has again become a hot topic in the Golden State. But despite the current bout of wildfires, the biggest source of smog in California remains the state's 33.5 million vehicles. Cal

The EPA says it plans to ban agricultural use of the pesticide chlorpyrifos, commonly used on some California crops. Credit: Chris Jordan-Bloch/Earthjustice.

FRESNO, Calif. – Environmental and farm workers' groups are cheering this week's announcement by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that it plans to ban agricultural use of the pesticide chlorpyrifos. The EPA banned the use of chlorpyrifos in homes 15 years ago. The agency now acknowle

PHOTO: The Bakersfield Crude Terminal is the subject of a lawsuit by environmental groups, and was recently cited by the EPA. It is owned by the same company which owns a pipeline that recently failed near Santa Barbara, spilling 100,000 gallons of oil into the Pacific. Photo credit: Elizabeth Forsyth/Earthjustice.

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. – A judge has refused to close down a controversial oil terminal near Bakersfield in Kern County, denying a preliminary injunction sought by environmental groups challenging permits for the facility. The terminal went on-line in December. Earthjustice attorney Elizabeth Fo

PHOTO: Rural water wells on farms can be contaminated by pesticide runoff, the subject of a recent lawsuit to force disclosure of groundwater data. Photo credit: HFK/Morguefile.com

SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. – A Monterey resident and the Environmental Law Foundation are suing the Central Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board because the board is allowing a coalition of growers to keep groundwater data secret. The suit aims to force all growers to publicize which well

PHOTO: The Belridge oil field near Taft in Kern County is nearly the size of a major city, and produces an extraordinary volume of wastewater every day, which some water-strapped Central Valley farmers are purchasing to water their crops. Photo credit: Peg Mitchell/San Diego 350.org.

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. - California Gov. Jerry Brown last week ordered the first-ever mandatory water restrictions in state history. The State Water Resources Control Board is imposing an immediate 25 percent reduction in water use among the 400 local water agencies around the state. But Patrick Sulli

PHOTO: Taxpayer-funded farm animal abuse is at the center of public outrage, and an investigation regarding what has been happening at a USDA Meat Research Center in Nebraska. Photo credit: Farm Sanctuary.

LOS ANGELES - An undercover investigation by a New York Times reporter at a USDA Meat Research Center in Nebraska has sparked outrage from animal welfare groups and the public, with thousands now calling on Congress to shut the research program down. Bruce Friedrich, director of advocacy and policy

PHOTO: Seven California counties depend heavily on Colorado River water, and a new study by Arizona State University quantifies just how much their economies would suffer if less water is available. Photo of Palo Verde Dam near Blythe, Calif., by Sandra J. Owen-Boyce, U.S. Geological Survey.

LOS ANGELES — A little more than half the economy of Southern California is dependent in some way on the health of the Colorado River system, according to a new report that quantifies the value of the river to the seven Western states that use it. Researchers at Arizona State University found

PHOTO: They may be tiny, but California's Delta smelt proved to be important enough that the case for protecting them made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Photo courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. - The highest court in the land has sided with one of the tiniest fish in California - by refusing to hear an appeal on Monday. The U.S. Supreme Court was asked by some California farming interests and water districts to consider overturning a case that affirms protections for th

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