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PNS Daily Newscast - August 10, 2020 


The U.S. tops 5 million COVID-19 cases; and the latest on the USPS mail slowdown.


2020Talks - August 10, 2020 


Sunday was the sixth anniversary of the police killing of Michael Brown. Tomorrow, Rep. Ilhan Omar faces off against a primary challenger in MN, plus primaries in CT, VT and WI. And a shakeup at the Postal Service.

Public News Service - CA: Consumer

The public has until Sept. 3 to weigh in on a proposal to loosen the rules on high-interest short-term loans. (Krosseel/Morguefile)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. - The Trump administration released a proposal this week that would make it easier for banks and payday lenders to charge sky high interest rates - despite California laws against predatory lending. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency wants to overturn the "true lender

The cellular industry claims that an ordinance requiring a sign such as this at the point-of-sale about safety is a violation of the manufacturer's First Amendment rights. (Zachary Marks)

SAN FRANCISCO -- Should cities be able to require a flyer at the point of sale advising people of cell-phone safety guidelines? That's the crux of a lawsuit that goes before a federal judge in San Francisco tomorrow, pitting the cell-phone industry against the city of Berkeley. The Cellular Teleco

T-Mobile/Sprint is promising to maintain its California workforce, but has asked to get out of its prior commitment to add 1,000 jobs in the state. (D3Damon/iStockphoto)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- The telecommunications company T-Mobile merged with Sprint a few months ago. It's already begging off some of its promises, and that's raising alarm bells with workers' advocates. When the California Public Utilities Commission approved the merger in mid-April, T-Mobile promis

An online webinar today explains what California residents can do to get affordable health coverage during the pandemic if they don't have it. (Pixabay)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Millions of Californians are facing the coronavirus pandemic without health insurance, either because they've lost a job or weren't covered to begin with. So today, a nonprofit consumer health advocacy coalition is offering a webinar on how to get covered. Rachel Linn Gish, di

Gov. Gavin Newsom met Friday with legislative leaders to work on the budget. (Clarissa Resultan/CA Dept. of Corrections and Rehabilitation)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Children's groups are speaking out against billions of dollars in state budget cuts being proposed in California, saying programs that benefit children should be a priority. As a result of the coronavirus pandemic, California has taken a budget nosedive going from a $5.6 bill

A new poll shows that consumers' opinions of General Motors drop as people learn more about the company's position on relaxing clean-car standards. (IFCAR/Wikimedia Commons)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- General Motors is losing ground with consumers over its support for the Trump administration's attacks on California's clean-car standards, a new poll finds. Pollsters working with the Union of Concerned Scientists found that GM's favorability ratings dropped 53% once people r

Consumer groups are urging people who drive less during the COVID-19 pandemic to ask their insurance company for a rebate. (Lutgradio/Morguefile)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Two car-insurance giants, Allstate and American Family Insurance, have just announced they'll refund $800 million to the drivers they insure. The companies say the rebates are possible because people are driving so much less during the COVID-19 crisis and, thus, collision clai

Nonprofits that serve the LGBTQ community are going virtual with their programs, including those to engage people in the 2020 census and the November elections. (MXRuben/Morguefile)

LOS ANGELES -- The COVID-19 crisis is really hurting nonprofit organizations -- in particular those that serve vulnerable populations. The LGBTQ community, for example, suffers high rates of HIV and cancer, which makes it more susceptible to the virus. Alphonso David, president of Human Rights C

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