Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 16, 2019 


A judge rules on a controversial citizenship question for the 2020 Census; some fishing communities expect to feel the effects of the government shutdown; and new climate concerns as Antarctic ice is melting faster than we thought.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Hunger/Food/Nutrition

Under current law, SNAP beneficiaries aged 18-49 not raising children cannot receive benefits for more than three months in a three-year period unless they are employed or are enrolled in a job-training program. (Maxpixel)

DENVER — The Trump administration's proposal to expand work requirements for SNAP benefits - the program formerly known as food stamps - is meant to get more people back into the workforce. But critics argue there’s a far better approach. Kate Kasper, director of public policy at Hunger

Immigrants applying for food stamps for their U.S. citizen children do not have to provide agencies with their personal immigration status. (Pixabay)

DENVER — Children's advocates are sounding the alarm about a recent proposal by the Trump administration that would make it easier to deny immigrants green cards by expanding the definition of what it means to be a "public charge," or dependent on government programs. Anya Rose, policy analy

Cereal, with or without milk, is the top menu choice for Denver Public School students. (USDA)

DENVER – Kids are back in school, and that means regular access to nutritious food for many Colorado children. Theresa Peña, regional coordinator for outreach and engagement with Denver Public Schools, says it's hard to learn on an empty stomach, and notes that DPS has made free breakfas

Recipients of SNAP, the program formerly known as food stamps, can double their purchasing power if they buy Colorado-grown produce at participating outlets. (Galatas)

SAGUACHE, Colo. – It's been just over a year since Colorado leaders came together to create a blueprint to end hunger in the state, and innovators in the remote San Luis Valley are leading the way. From doubling food stamp dollars at markets and grocery stores, to helping small farmers deliv

To find a free summer meal for any Coloradan age 18 and younger, text the word

DENVER – Summer activities for kids are at full pitch, and Colorado parents may not realize that many of the same pools and recreation centers where kids meet up with their friends also are offering free, nutritious meals for anyone age 18 and younger. Ellie Agar, interim communications direc

As the cost of living in Colorado continues to rise, many families depend on food pantries just to get by. (Public Domain Pictures)

DENVER – Colorado farmers are set to see a big boost in local spending, and more residents will have access to their produce, after the state's Joint Budget Committee earmarked $500,000 for purchasing so-called Colorado Proud goods. Larry Martinez, associate director of Denver Inner City Par

Low-income children in Colorado are almost twice as likely to go without fruits and vegetables as are other kids. (Erik Scheel/Pexels)

DENVER – From May to October, a rainbow of locally grown produce arrives at farmers markets, and at some 85 locations across Colorado, food stamps are worth double for fruits and vegetables. The "Double Up Food Bucks" program allows SNAP recipients to use their EBT cards to get up to $20 in

Lyndsey Williams (r), director of La Puente's Food Bank Network of the San Luis Valley, speaks with Colorado Health Foundation President and CEO Karen McNeil-Miller in Caņon City. (Sarah Skeen)

CAÑON CITY, Colo. – Even with Colorado's overall robust economy, poverty, especially in rural areas, continues to be the leading driver of inequity when it comes to health. A recent Colorado Health Foundation event in Cañon City put a spotlight on innovative efforts under way to addr

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