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PNS Daily Newscast - June 5, 2020 


It will likely take donations to help the Twin Cities recover from damage by looters; and state and local governments look for relief in next stimulus bill.

2020Talks - June 5, 2020 


Democrats and Republicans have had drastically different responses to President Trump's militarized response to protests in the nation's capital. And, new electoral maps will be drawn next year, some by legislatures and others by outside entities.

Public News Service - CO: Hunger/Food/Nutrition

Recipients of SNAP, the program formerly known as food stamps, can double their purchasing power if they buy Colorado-grown produce at participating outlets. (Galatas)

SAGUACHE, Colo. – It's been just over a year since Colorado leaders came together to create a blueprint to end hunger in the state, and innovators in the remote San Luis Valley are leading the way. From doubling food stamp dollars at markets and grocery stores, to helping small farmers deliv

To find a free summer meal for any Coloradan age 18 and younger, text the word

DENVER – Summer activities for kids are at full pitch, and Colorado parents may not realize that many of the same pools and recreation centers where kids meet up with their friends also are offering free, nutritious meals for anyone age 18 and younger. Ellie Agar, interim communications direc

As the cost of living in Colorado continues to rise, many families depend on food pantries just to get by. (Public Domain Pictures)

DENVER – Colorado farmers are set to see a big boost in local spending, and more residents will have access to their produce, after the state's Joint Budget Committee earmarked $500,000 for purchasing so-called Colorado Proud goods. Larry Martinez, associate director of Denver Inner City Par

Low-income children in Colorado are almost twice as likely to go without fruits and vegetables as are other kids. (Erik Scheel/Pexels)

DENVER – From May to October, a rainbow of locally grown produce arrives at farmers markets, and at some 85 locations across Colorado, food stamps are worth double for fruits and vegetables. The "Double Up Food Bucks" program allows SNAP recipients to use their EBT cards to get up to $20 in

Lyndsey Williams (r), director of La Puente's Food Bank Network of the San Luis Valley, speaks with Colorado Health Foundation President and CEO Karen McNeil-Miller in Caņon City. (Sarah Skeen)

CAÑON CITY, Colo. – Even with Colorado's overall robust economy, poverty, especially in rural areas, continues to be the leading driver of inequity when it comes to health. A recent Colorado Health Foundation event in Cañon City put a spotlight on innovative efforts under way to addr

New analysis shows more than 12 percent of Colorado households struggle to afford a nutritional diet, and many low-income households would face severe food insecurity without SNAP benefits. (Pixabay)

DENVER – As Congress heads into recess next week, a new report by the Colorado Fiscal Institute highlights the importance of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps, to local economies. As of March 2017, 476,000 Coloradans participated in the progra

Two-thirds of SNAP recipients are children, the elderly and people with disabilities. (Pixabay)

DENVER - The U.S. House Agriculture Committee is expected today to hear a draft Farm Bill that would require millions of people currently caring for children, and those between the ages of 50 and 59, to find a job or lose their Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. Katharine Fe

Nearly 20 percent of Coloradans in their prime working years, ages 25 to 64, have been unable to join the workforce. (Pixabay)

DENVER – It can happen to anyone. You're about to leave for a job interview – and your car won't start. But what might seem like a relatively minor setback for many can end up being an insurmountable barrier for people struggling to make ends meet. House Bill 1310, making its way throu

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