Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 22, 2018 


GOP leadership puts its efforts to fix immigration on hold. Also on the Friday rundown: Florida students take their gun control message to the Midwest; and a call for renewal of the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Livable Wages/Working Families

U.S. Supreme Court Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor noted in Monday's decision that  cakeshop owner Jack Phillips violated Colorado's anti-discrimination law. (Jeffrey Beall)

DENVER – On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a Colorado cake shop owner who refused to bake a wedding cake for a gay couple, but also underscored that the Constitution does not give businesses open to the public the right to discriminate. In Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado C

Approximately 833,000 people drive for Uber in a year, which would account for 0.56 percent of all employment. But on average drivers work 17 hours per week and just three months. (Mark Warner)

DENVER – The nation is making progress toward full employment, according to recent data, but don't rush to attribute that to the so-called gig economy. A new report from the Economic Policy Institute shows the impact of tech companies such as Uber is overrated. Lawrence Mishel, a distingui

Colorado ranks 40th nationally in per-pupil spending largely because of TABOR, a state constitutional amendment that restricts spending. (Lena Howland/KOAA News 5)

PUEBLO, Colo. – Pueblo school teachers won't be heading back to their classrooms Wednesday, as Colorado's first teachers' strike in more than 20 years enters its third day. Suzanne Ethredge, president of the Pueblo Education Association, says the Pueblo School District can resolve the impass

Newsroom staff members were relocated from downtown offices near the State Capitol to the paper's printing plant earlier this year to cut costs. (Galatas)

DENVER – Unrest between Denver Post workers and hedge fund owner Alden Global Capital is on the rise after editorial page editor Chuck Plunkett resigned late last week. Workers at The Denver Post and other newspapers across the nation are set to protest Tuesday what they say are predatory ma

Raising the minimum wage can lead to increased worker productivity and decreased turnover costs for businesses. (Tirachard Kumtanom/Pexels)

DENVER - Even with this year's increase in Colorado's minimum wage, now at $10.20 an hour, workers in ski-resort counties and cities such as Boulder continue to struggle. On Thursday, a state Senate committee is scheduled to hear a bill that would allow municipalities to set their own minimum wages.

New analysis shows more than 12 percent of Colorado households struggle to afford a nutritional diet, and many low-income households would face severe food insecurity without SNAP benefits. (Pixabay)

DENVER – As Congress heads into recess next week, a new report by the Colorado Fiscal Institute highlights the importance of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps, to local economies. As of March 2017, 476,000 Coloradans participated in the progra

Two-thirds of SNAP recipients are children, the elderly and people with disabilities. (Pixabay)

DENVER - The U.S. House Agriculture Committee is expected today to hear a draft Farm Bill that would require millions of people currently caring for children, and those between the ages of 50 and 59, to find a job or lose their Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. Katharine Fe

A new study shows that local governments are better positioned to connect traditionally underserved communities to broadband internet. (Pixabay)

DENVER – As Congress considers remedies for large-scale privacy breaches by Cambridge Analytica and Facebook, a recent report suggests that local municipalities could play a key role in protecting consumers. The American Civil Liberties Union study says if cities and counties build out their

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