Newscasts

PNS Daily News - September 18, 2019 


President Trump visits California, targeting its homelessness crisis and environmental protections; and Tennessee is a top destination for out-of-state women seeking abortions.

2020Talks - September 18, 2019. (3 min.)  


Interfaith Alliance's Connie Ryan and Family Leader's Bob Vander Plaats on their differing views of religion's role in politics; and former Rep. Mark Sanford confers with cardboard cutout of President Trump.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Livable Wages/Working Families

Newsroom staff members were relocated from downtown offices near the State Capitol to the paper's printing plant earlier this year to cut costs. (Galatas)

DENVER – Unrest between Denver Post workers and hedge fund owner Alden Global Capital is on the rise after editorial page editor Chuck Plunkett resigned late last week. Workers at The Denver Post and other newspapers across the nation are set to protest Tuesday what they say are predatory ma

Raising the minimum wage can lead to increased worker productivity and decreased turnover costs for businesses. (Tirachard Kumtanom/Pexels)

DENVER - Even with this year's increase in Colorado's minimum wage, now at $10.20 an hour, workers in ski-resort counties and cities such as Boulder continue to struggle. On Thursday, a state Senate committee is scheduled to hear a bill that would allow municipalities to set their own minimum wages.

New analysis shows more than 12 percent of Colorado households struggle to afford a nutritional diet, and many low-income households would face severe food insecurity without SNAP benefits. (Pixabay)

DENVER – As Congress heads into recess next week, a new report by the Colorado Fiscal Institute highlights the importance of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps, to local economies. As of March 2017, 476,000 Coloradans participated in the progra

Two-thirds of SNAP recipients are children, the elderly and people with disabilities. (Pixabay)

DENVER - The U.S. House Agriculture Committee is expected today to hear a draft Farm Bill that would require millions of people currently caring for children, and those between the ages of 50 and 59, to find a job or lose their Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. Katharine Fe

A new study shows that local governments are better positioned to connect traditionally underserved communities to broadband internet. (Pixabay)

DENVER – As Congress considers remedies for large-scale privacy breaches by Cambridge Analytica and Facebook, a recent report suggests that local municipalities could play a key role in protecting consumers. The American Civil Liberties Union study says if cities and counties build out their

Nearly 20 percent of Coloradans in their prime working years, ages 25 to 64, have been unable to join the workforce. (Pixabay)

DENVER – It can happen to anyone. You're about to leave for a job interview – and your car won't start. But what might seem like a relatively minor setback for many can end up being an insurmountable barrier for people struggling to make ends meet. House Bill 1310, making its way throu

At least nine states, including Colorado, are considering measures that would make it easier for companies to classify workers as independent contractors if they are signed up with platforms including Uber. (Sandeepnewstyle/Wikimedia Commons)

DENVER – More than 100,000 workers in the "gig economy" - including drivers, plumbers, electricians and child-care professionals - could lose workers-comp and unemployment-insurance coverage if a new bill making its way through the state Legislature becomes law. Senate Bill 171 would change

Colorado could save up to $2 billion a year on health care and other costs associated with not having regular access to nutritious food. (Pixabay)

DENVER – A

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