Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 14, 2018. 


Hate crimes are on the rise in the United States. Also on the Wednesday rundown: A big hearing in Denver on EPA's proposed rollback of methane limits; plus find out about "Give to the Max Day."

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Senior Issues

AARP Colorado holds a town hall meeting at the Evans Community Center, 1100 37th St., from 1 to 3  p.m. on Tuesday. (City of Evans)

DENVER – AARP Colorado is on the road for its statewide Get in the Know Tour to find out what older Coloradans think about the current political climate, and to give updates on upcoming legislation. Kelli Fritts, director of advocacy for AARP Colorado, says the issue weighing heaviest on peo

Scott Bookman with Uncompahgre Medical Center in Norwood says connectivity issues can slow transmission of medical images such as x-rays to remote radiologists, hampering diagnosis and care for patients. (David Cornwell)

DENVER – Colorado leaders are doubling down on efforts to make sure all parts of the state have high-speed access to the Internet. Tony Neal-Graves, executive director of the Broadband Office for the Governor's Office of Information Technology, says government has a role to play getting all

New research shows a majority of Coloradans realize climate change is happening, but fewer understand the potential health impacts. (George Frey/Getty Images)

DENVER – Public health experts in Colorado are narrowing in on the effects of climate change on human health. And they're warning that people who work outdoors, low-income families, seniors and children are among those who will bear the brunt of rising temperatures. Rosemary Rochford, a prof

Children, seniors and people with disabilities receive almost 70 percent of SNAP benefits. (Getty Images)

DENVER – The Trump administration's tax proposals would not benefit all taxpayers or states equally, according to new analysis from the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy. Matt Gardner, a senior fellow with the institute, says the richest 1 percent of taxpayers would receive more than

More than 80 percent of Coloradans age 50 and older oppose cuts to Medicaid, and insurance companies charging people who have pre-existing medical conditions. (Getty Images)

DENVER – With the U.S. Senate back at work this week on a plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, advocates for older Coloradans on Wednesday are set to deliver more than 5,200 petitions to Sen. Cory Gardner's office in Denver, urging him to oppose the Better Care Reconciliation Ac

The average tax break for millionaires in Colorado under a health-care bill passed by the U.S. House is projected to be $40,000 a year. (Getty Images)

DENVER – Resistance to efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act is heating up after the U.S. Senate made public its Better Care Reconciliation Act. Rallies were held in Colorado on Friday and across the nation over the weekend, and members of the group "Patriotic Millionaires" a

Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., is one of 13 senators crafting a bill that would replace the Affordable Care Act. (Getty Images)

DENVER -- A group of 13 U.S. senators, including Colorado's Cory Gardner, have still not made public their plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Adam Fox, director of strategic engagement at the Colorado Consumer Health Initiative, warned that if the Senate's version is anything like

Proposed cuts to Medicaid would largely impact the elderly, people with disabilities, pregnant women and children. (Getty Images)

DENVER – Colorado's millionaires could see an average tax cut of close to $40,000 a year if the American Health Care Act (AHCA) becomes law, according to new analysis. Those tax cuts would be paid for in part by removing more than 270,000 Coloradans from health insurance rolls. Alan Essig,

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