Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 21, 2018 


President Donald Trump reverses course on some aspects of his border policy. Also on the Thursday rundown: With midterms approaching, we take you to a state that you might not expect to be reaching out to Latino voters; and reporter Dan Heyman has a novel angle on the utility of medical marijuana

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Social Justice

K-12 staff responsible for protecting students from sexual harassment and discrimination have other full-time responsibilities including district superintendent and director of human resources. (Twenty20)

BOULDER, Co. – Public schools in Colorado face significant challenges protecting students from sexual assault, harassment and discrimination, according to a new CU-Boulder study. Researchers found that key staff responsible for preventing and responding to harassment frequently didn't know it

U.S. Supreme Court Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor noted in Monday's decision that  cakeshop owner Jack Phillips violated Colorado's anti-discrimination law. (Jeffrey Beall)

DENVER – On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a Colorado cake shop owner who refused to bake a wedding cake for a gay couple, but also underscored that the Constitution does not give businesses open to the public the right to discriminate. In Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado C

Rosa Sabido, seen here with her mother Blanca Valdivia, followed orders by ICE to report each year for a temporary stay, until her last request was denied. (Dana Peterson)

By Lornet Turnbull/Broadcast version by Eric Galatas Reporting for the Yes! Magazine-Colorado News Connection Collaboration It’s been nearly a year since Rosa Sabido packed up nearly three decades of her life, hugged her ailing mother goodbye, and moved into the sanctuary of a Colorado chur

As the cost of living in Colorado continues to rise, many families depend on food pantries just to get by. (Public Domain Pictures)

DENVER – Colorado farmers are set to see a big boost in local spending, and more residents will have access to their produce, after the state's Joint Budget Committee earmarked $500,000 for purchasing so-called Colorado Proud goods. Larry Martinez, associate director of Denver Inner City Par

Colorado ranks 40th nationally in per-pupil spending largely because of TABOR, a state constitutional amendment that restricts spending. (Lena Howland/KOAA News 5)

PUEBLO, Colo. – Pueblo school teachers won't be heading back to their classrooms Wednesday, as Colorado's first teachers' strike in more than 20 years enters its third day. Suzanne Ethredge, president of the Pueblo Education Association, says the Pueblo School District can resolve the impass

New analysis shows more than 12 percent of Colorado households struggle to afford a nutritional diet, and many low-income households would face severe food insecurity without SNAP benefits. (Pixabay)

DENVER – As Congress heads into recess next week, a new report by the Colorado Fiscal Institute highlights the importance of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps, to local economies. As of March 2017, 476,000 Coloradans participated in the progra

President Donald Trump's executive order in May 2017 instructed Attorney General Jeff Sessions to “issue guidance interpreting religious liberty protections in Federal law.” (Getty Images)

DENVER – The Trump administration's guidelines allowing what it calls "religious exemptions" has opened the door for discrimination across dozens of federal agencies and programs, according to a new report – Liberty and Justice for a Select Few – from the Center for American Progre

At least nine states, including Colorado, are considering measures that would make it easier for companies to classify workers as independent contractors if they are signed up with platforms including Uber. (Sandeepnewstyle/Wikimedia Commons)

DENVER – More than 100,000 workers in the "gig economy" - including drivers, plumbers, electricians and child-care professionals - could lose workers-comp and unemployment-insurance coverage if a new bill making its way through the state Legislature becomes law. Senate Bill 171 would change

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