Newscasts

PNS Daily News - November 22, 2019 


President Trump signs a spending bill to avert a government shutdown; it's deadline day for cities to opt out of a federal opioid settlement; and a new report says unsafe toys still are in stores.

2020Talks - November 22, 2019 


Affordable housing legislation was introduced in Congress yesterday, following the first debate questions about housing. Plus, Israeli PM Bibi Netanyahu was indicted for fraud, bribery, and breach of trust, just days after the Trump administration’s policy greenlighting Israeli settlement of the West Bank. And finally, former NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg continues his slow and steady potential entry into the race.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Toxics

Signs suggesting a changing climate in Colorado include over 475,000 acres consumed by wildfires in 2018. The U.S. Drought Monitor recently reported that 70% of the state is considered “abnormally dry.” (BLM/Wikimedia Commons)

DENVER – Health professionals are calling out Sen. Cory Gardner of Colorado for his party-line vote last week blocking efforts to keep the Clean Power Plan on the books. The plan would have put limits on climate pollution from power plants for the first time. Dr. Cory Carroll at Foothills

Striking students want leaders to prioritize the health of families over fossil-fuel industry profits by prohibiting campaign funding from industry executives, lobbyists and PACs. (Pexels)

DENVER - Students in Colorado and across the globe are planning to walk out of classes Friday as part of an ongoing Climate Strike movement launched by 16-year-old Greta Thunberg of Sweden. Thomas Lopez, an organizer for the International Indigenous Youth Council, said young people are demanding cl

Nationally, the transportation sector is the number one source for greenhouse gas emissions. (Pxhere)

DENVER – Colorado's Air Quality Control Commission wraps up hearings Thursday over whether the state should require automakers to make a certain number of zero-emission vehicles available for sale. Jen Clanahan, head mom with the group Colorado Moms Know Best, says Colorado has an opportunit

For four decades, individual states have had the authority under the Clean Air Act to adopt stronger tailpipe pollution standards than those set by the federal government. (U.S. Energy Department)<br />

WESTMINISTER, Colo. – Colorado's new standards to limit pollution from vehicle tailpipes could be headed to court if the Trump administration moves ahead with plans to roll back federal standards created under the Obama administration. Dr. Sheela Mahnke, a pediatrician and Westminster City C

Mercury pollution in the U.S. has declined by 80 percent since 2012. The neurotoxic heavy metal has been shown to disrupt fetal brain development. (Tony Webster/Wikimedia Commons)

LAFAYETTE, Colo. - Moms from Colorado and 14 other states testified this week in Washington, D.C., at the only hearing scheduled by the Environmental Protection Agency on its plans to repeal some air pollution protections at coal plants. Former Lafayette Mayor Christine Berg of Lafayette, a mother

More than 80 percent of Colorado voters believe it is important for states to use funds to protect and restore the health of rivers, lakes and streams. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Voters in Colorado and other western states continue to support conservation policies for publicly owned lands, putting them at odds with the Trump administration's energy dominance agenda, according to the ninth annual Conservation in the West Poll from Colorado College. Gov. Jared

Methane emissions at the Yellow Jacket Compressor Station, near Canyon of the Ancients in Colorado, as seen by an industry-standard optical gas-imaging camera. (Earthworks)

DENVER - Today in Denver, the Environmental Protection Agency is to hold the only public hearing nationwide on its decision to roll back standards designed to reduce methane pollution from oil and gas facilities. Conservation groups have asked British Petroleum, which recently moved its headquarter

Xcel plans to replace the lost capacity from the early retirement of Comanche power stations 1 and 2 in Pueblo with a mixture of renewable resources and natural gas. (Mike Lewinski/Fickr)

DENVER — Colorado's Public Utilities Commission has signed off on Xcel Energy's Colorado Energy Plan. And according to new analysis by the Colorado Fiscal Institute, the plan should bring significant health benefits. The plan calls for shuttering two coal-fired power plants in Pueblo County

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