Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 3, 2020 


Economists say coronavirus disaster declarations may be the quickest path to reopening; militia groups use virus, Independence Day to recruit followers.

2020Talks - July 3, 2020 


Trump visits South Dakota's Black Hills, Mt. Rushmore today; nearby tribal leaders object, citing concerns over COVID-19 and a fireworks display. Plus, voter registration numbers are down from this time in 2016.

Public News Service - CO: Civic Engagement

U.S. Rep. Joe Neguse, D-Colo., says the state's 30 federally funded research labs and joint institutes on climate science are poised to help the nation achieve net-zero emissions by 2050. (Franmarie Metzler/Wikimedia Commons)

DENVER -- This week, House Democrats in Congress unveiled a plan to address climate change by achieving net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. In a press briefing, Rep. Joe Neguse, D-Colo., called climate change "an existential threat," and pointed to Colorado's commitment to transition to wind and sol

The ADA requires many employers to provide reasonable accommodations to employees with disabilities, and requires accessibility improvements in public spaces. (PEDS/Flickr)

DENVER -- It's been 30 years since disability-rights activists saw President George H.W. Bush sign the Americans with Disabilities Act into law. The civil rights legislation prohibits discrimination based on ability. Christiano Sosa, executive director of The Arc of Colorado, said that what has com

State officials estimate that 97% of top jobs in Colorado that pay a living wage require a post-secondary certificate or degree. (Pixabay)

DENVER -- Colorado's community colleges have launched a new program designed to help more students complete a bachelor's degree, and reduce a significant racial equity gap in Colorado's education system. Angie Paccione, executive director of the Colorado Department of Higher Education, says 75% of

Census numbers determine how the federal government distributes taxpayer dollars to states for education, food assistance, health care, housing and many children's programs. (U.S. Census Bureau)

DENVER --The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way nonprofits delivering in-home early-childhood development programs connect with families. As the deadline for the 2020 census draws nearer, Heather Tritten, executive director at Parent Possible, said her group's home visitors are reaching out to

Colorado currently ranks last in the nation in teacher wage competitiveness, spending $2,800 less per student than the national average. (USAF)

DENVER -- The COVID-19 pandemic has made collecting signatures for ballot measures a lot trickier. But one coalition effort to convince Colorado voters to approve a dedicated revenue stream for schools and other public needs is launching dozens of pop-up stations across the state this Saturday. Sc

Senate Bill 215, which aims to expand coverage for frontline workers, has passed the Coloardo Legislature's Senate Finance Committee and now advances to Appropriations. (Pixabay)

DENVER -- Colorado lawmakers are considering a measure that would shore up the state's reinsurance program and expand access to more affordable health insurance for thousands of Coloradans who are not able to get assistance under the Affordable Care Act. Karla Gonzales Garcia, policy director for

Last week, the U.S. Census Bureau began a phased restart of field operations in an additional 14 states, and there's at least one field office at work in all 50 states. (U.S. Census Bureau)

DENVER -- The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the landscape for groups working to ensure an accurate count in the 2020 census. It's estimated that 50% of people who rely on programs that get funding based on census numbers go uncounted. Brandon Stiller, creative director at the Open Media Foundation

A recent survey found that 79% of Democratic voters and 65% of Republicans want the option of voting remotely during the COVID-19 health emergency. (Paul Sableman Flickr)

DENVER -- A majority of voters across party lines say they want the option to mail in their ballots during the pandemic, according to a recent Reuters/Ipsos polL, and many states are giving Colorado's all-mail ballot voting model a harder look. Since 2014, all registered voters in Colorado have re

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