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PNS Daily Newscast - June 22, 2018 


GOP leadership puts its efforts to fix immigration on hold. Also on the Friday rundown: Florida students take their gun control message to the Midwest; and a call for renewal of the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Children's Issues

As the cost of living in Colorado continues to rise, many families depend on food pantries just to get by. (Public Domain Pictures)

DENVER – Colorado farmers are set to see a big boost in local spending, and more residents will have access to their produce, after the state's Joint Budget Committee earmarked $500,000 for purchasing so-called Colorado Proud goods. Larry Martinez, associate director of Denver Inner City Par

Colorado ranks 40th nationally in per-pupil spending largely because of TABOR, a state constitutional amendment that restricts spending. (Lena Howland/KOAA News 5)

PUEBLO, Colo. – Pueblo school teachers won't be heading back to their classrooms Wednesday, as Colorado's first teachers' strike in more than 20 years enters its third day. Suzanne Ethredge, president of the Pueblo Education Association, says the Pueblo School District can resolve the impass

Low-income children in Colorado are almost twice as likely to go without fruits and vegetables as are other kids. (Erik Scheel/Pexels)

DENVER – From May to October, a rainbow of locally grown produce arrives at farmers markets, and at some 85 locations across Colorado, food stamps are worth double for fruits and vegetables. The "Double Up Food Bucks" program allows SNAP recipients to use their EBT cards to get up to $20 in

A new national poll found just 25 percent of respondents believe teachers are paid fairly, and three in four think teachers have the right to strike. (Galatas)

DENVER – Teachers from across Colorado say they'll rally outside the State Capitol again Friday, urging lawmakers to fully fund the state's public schools. Henry Roman, president of the Denver Classroom Teachers Association, says educators are taking a personal day to stand up for students,

New analysis shows more than 12 percent of Colorado households struggle to afford a nutritional diet, and many low-income households would face severe food insecurity without SNAP benefits. (Pixabay)

DENVER – As Congress heads into recess next week, a new report by the Colorado Fiscal Institute highlights the importance of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps, to local economies. As of March 2017, 476,000 Coloradans participated in the progra

Two-thirds of SNAP recipients are children, the elderly and people with disabilities. (Pixabay)

DENVER - The U.S. House Agriculture Committee is expected today to hear a draft Farm Bill that would require millions of people currently caring for children, and those between the ages of 50 and 59, to find a job or lose their Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. Katharine Fe

Latino Advocacy Day activists are urging Colorado lawmakers to pass House Bill 1157, which would strengthen requirements for the oil and gas industry to report accidents, spills and harmful emissions. (Getty Images)

DENVER – Some 200 people from across Colorado gathered in Denver over the weekend in preparation for the 12th annual Latino Advocacy Day Monday at the State Capitol. Hilda Nucete, program director for Protégete, funded by the Conservation Colorado, says while participants are taking ser

Colorado could save up to $2 billion a year on health care and other costs associated with not having regular access to nutritious food. (Pixabay)

DENVER – A

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