Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 10, 2020 


The Supreme Court opens the door for prosecutors to seek President Trump's financial records; a backlash in Florida on school reopening plans.

2020Talks - July 10, 2020 


US Supreme Court rules on Trump's tax returns; Houston mayor cancels Texas GOP's in-person convention; Louisiana has elections; and DC council gives people incarcerated for felonies the right to vote.

Public News Service - CT: Livable Wages/Working Families

Civilian Conservation Corps crews completed the Ellie Mitchell Pavilion in Rocky Neck State Park in 1936. (Edward Fritzen/Flickr)

ROCKY NECK STATE PARK, Conn. - Environmental groups are calling on Congress to revive the Civilian Conservation Corps, in order to put people back to work while at the same time, improving beaches, trails and forests. Connecticut state parks are dotted with stone structures, trails and roads that

Cash is in short supply for Connecticut families hard-hit during the lockdown, and the United Way says many were having financial difficulty long before this. (Cohdra/Morguefile)

HARTFORD, Conn. - About 450,000 people in Connecticut have lost their jobs and filed for unemployment since the COVID-19 pandemic took hold - and now the United Way is offering free financial coaching and small grants to help some stave off bankruptcy. TrustPlus is part of the ALICE Saves program,

Restaurants are counting on their insurance companies to honor claims, to help them rehire workers and reopen when the COVID-19 pandemic subsides. But the fine print in many policies is tripping them up. (Adobe Stock)

HARTFORD, Conn. -- Consumer groups want insurance companies to help prop up the restaurant industry, which has taken a massive hit in the COVID-19 crisis. Tens of thousands of restaurants have been forced to close their dining rooms, and many have closed entirely, resulting in massive layoffs. Dou

A proposal by Senate minority leader Charles Schumer would help build the charging stations needed for the transition to electric vehicles. (rh2010/Adobe Stock)

HARTFORD, Conn. – Clean air advocates say combating climate change requires switching from gas-powered cars to clean electric vehicles, and a bill being proposed in Washington could jump-start that transition. Senate minority leader Charles Schumer of New York has proposed a sweeping measure

Older workers may want the flexibility of a part-time job or working from home. (MinDof/Adobe Stock)

HARTFORD, Conn. — Many Connecticut workers over 50 find they need a little extra income or a more flexible work schedule, and now there's help available to connect them with jobs. From family caregivers who would prefer to work from home to retirees who want to return to the workforce, jobs

The minimum wage bill, signed last week, will raise pay for 330,000 Connecticut workers. (govnedlamont/instgram.com)

HARTFORD, Conn. – With Connecticut set to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour, labor organizers now are setting their sights on making further gains for low-wage workers. Now that Gov. Ned Lamont has signed the legislation, Connecticut's minimum wage will go up to $11 an hour in October, a

There are 13,000 manufacturing jobs available in Connecticut. (Pexels/pixabay)

HARTFORD, Conn. – Manufacturing is booming in Connecticut and retirees with experience in a variety of fields are needed to become teachers or mentors for the students who will fill those jobs. The growth of manufacturing jobs in the state is not only fueling demand for trained workers. Ther

The share of family income that Connecticut's poorest pays in property taxes is 13 times higher than what the top 1 percent of earners pays. (schuldnerhilfe/Pixabay)

NEW HAVEN, Conn. – When it comes to paying taxes, being poor in Connecticut is very expensive – at least, that's the finding of a new report. The report, by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy and Connecticut Voices for Children, found the state's lowest-income earners pay 41

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