Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - Friday, August 23, 2019 


A federal court ruling changes how the President is elected, and Florida Democrats trigger a special session vote on guns. Those stories and more in today's news.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CT: Civic Engagement

The Bushmaster AR-15 rifle used at Sandy Hook Elementary School. (Newtown Police/Wikimedia Commons)

HARTFORD, Conn. -- Connecticut's ban on assault weapons has survived a challenge in federal court. On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear the appeal of a federal court ruling upholding the state ban on the sale of military-style assault rifles and large-capacity magazines. Ron Pinciaro,

The planned DHS raids will target women and children for deportation. (ICE/Wikimedia Commons)

HARTFORD, Conn. - Immigrant advocates are rallying in front of the Abraham A. Ribicoff Federal Building in Hartford today to demand that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) stop its plan to deport Central American refugee women and children who have lost their cases in immigration courts back

About 12 percent of the Connecticut primary ballots were cast by 18- to 29-year-olds this year. (Kreg Steppe/Flickr)

HARTFORD, Conn. - Young voters turned out in record numbers for Tuesday's primary in Connecticut -- and they voted their own way. An estimated 66,000 voters from ages 18 to 29 went to the polls this week. According to Abby Kiesa, news coordinator and researcher at the Center for Information and Res

Tax expenditures cost Connecticut $7.2 billion annually in lost revenue. (Ragesoss/Wikimedia Commons)

NEW HAVEN, Conn. - With the state facing massive public-employee layoffs and a $900 million budget deficit next year, one group is calling for a closer look at tax expenditures. The tax breaks and tax credits Connecticut allows now amount to more than $7 billion a year, a 71 percent increase sinc

Closing what is known as the carried interest loophole would generate $535 million a year in tax revenue for Connecticut. (PublicDomainPictures/Pixabay)

HARTFORD, Conn. - Advocates for Connecticut's poor and people with disabilities say the state could generate more than a half-billion dollars in revenue each year by closing a loophole that benefits hedge-fund and private-equity managers. The federal government gives those very high earners a big

Counting prisoners as local residents gives communities with prisons some extra representation in politics. (Sean Hobson/flickr)

HARTFORD, Conn. - A coalition of organizations wants Connecticut to end the practice of counting prisoners as residents of the towns where the prisons are located. It's known as "prison gerrymandering," and civil-rights advocates say it undermines the principle of "one person, one vote." Peter Wagn

Almost 90 percent of corn for feeding cattle, pigs and chickens is grown from genetically modified seeds. Credit: Juliacasado1/pixabay.com

NEW HAVEN, Conn. - A challenge to a Vermont law requiring the labeling of foods containing genetically modified organisms goes before a federal court of appeals this week, and the results could affect Connecticut. Connecticut passed a GMO labeling law in 2013, but it can't go into effect until at l

PHOTO: Consumer advocates suggest if you want to get the most bang for your buck with your charitable donations in 2015, you should first do some homework. Credit: M. Clifford

HARTFORD, Conn. - Now that 2015 has arrived, some people are making decisions about how to get the most bang for their buck with their charitable contributions in the new year. Local advocates suggest you do some research before you donate. Jackie MacKnight, director of community relations for th

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