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PNS Daily News - December 9, 2019 


The Pensacola shooting investigated as an act of terror; Trump faces criticism over so-called anti-Semitic comments; and some local governments adapt to meet the needs of immigrants.

2020Talks - December 9, 2019 


Candidates have a busy week in Iowa, despite a weekend shooting on Pensacola Navy Air Base. Also, candidates start butting heads, notably South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg and MA Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

Public News Service - CT: Criminal Justice

In Connecticut, 82 percent of the people involved in taser incidents last year were unarmed. (Junglecat/Wikimedia Commons)

HARTFORD, Conn. – Civil rights advocates say a first-of-its-kind report on the use of tasers shows that police in Connecticut need better training. Connecticut is the first state to require annual reports on police use of the electric shock devices. According to David McGuire, legislative an

Connecticut's prison population fell 17 percent and crime decreased by 25 percent between 2006 and 2014. (my_southborough/Flickr)

HARTFORD, Conn. - States that reduce their prison populations are seeing their crime rates go down, too. In the 1990s, getting "tough on crime" led to a rapid rise in the number of people incarcerated. Now, with more than 2 million behind bars, the United States has the largest prison population in

Sixty-one agencies in 23 states are known to possess stingray technology. (ACLU.org)

HARTFORD, Conn. - A landmark cellphone privacy bill is on its way to Gov. Danell Malloy's desk. House Bill 5640 already had passed in the House by a vote of 140 to zero, and Wednesday night it cleared the Senate also without a single dissenting vote. Since 2005, police have received more than

Nationally, police SWAT teams now conduct 60,000 raids a year. (Fiatswat800/Wikimedia Commons)

HARTFORD, Conn. – Following the police killing of a Stamford man, civil liberties advocates are calling for more transparency on how, when and why police deploy SWAT units. Dylan Pape, 25, was killed in his home by a Stamford Police Special Response Team on Monday. The death is still being in

The bill would remove criminal history questions from job applications. (Kathryn Decker/flickr.com)

NEW HAVEN, Conn. - The General Assembly is considering a bill that would remove barriers to employment for people with criminal records. Most job applications have a little box to check off to indicate that an applicant has a criminal conviction, and that's usually as far as the application goes.

Counting prisoners as local residents gives communities with prisons some extra representation in politics. (Sean Hobson/flickr)

HARTFORD, Conn. - A coalition of organizations wants Connecticut to end the practice of counting prisoners as residents of the towns where the prisons are located. It's known as "prison gerrymandering," and civil-rights advocates say it undermines the principle of "one person, one vote." Peter Wagn

Data shows Connecticut police fired stun guns at black and Hispanic suspects at higher rates than whites. (Junglecat/Wikimedia Commons)

HARTFORD, Conn. - Preliminary data shows racial disparities in the use of stun guns by police in Connecticut. Connecticut is the first state in the nation to account for the use of stun guns, or tasers, by law enforcement. Though an official report hasn't been issued, David McGuire, legislative an

Hundreds of Connecticut residents continue to languish in jail, often for minor offenses, because they can't afford bail. Credit: Daniel Schwen/Wikimedia Commons.

HARTFORD, Conn. – Governor Dannel Malloy says he wants the state to explore ways to reform the bail bond system in Connecticut. Nonviolent offenses like drug possession or even traffic tickets can land a person in jail. Once bail is set, release can often be secured for 10 percent or less of

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