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PNS Daily Newscast - August 6, 2020 


Facebook removes a Trump post because of "deceptive" COVID19 claims; small businesses seek more pandemic relief.


2020Talks - August 6, 2020 


Iowa's governor has restored the right to vote for people with past felony convictions via executive order; and Tennessee has a primary election today.

Public News Service - CT: Criminal Justice

Nationally, police SWAT teams now conduct 60,000 raids a year. (Fiatswat800/Wikimedia Commons)

HARTFORD, Conn. – Following the police killing of a Stamford man, civil liberties advocates are calling for more transparency on how, when and why police deploy SWAT units. Dylan Pape, 25, was killed in his home by a Stamford Police Special Response Team on Monday. The death is still being in

The bill would remove criminal history questions from job applications. (Kathryn Decker/flickr.com)

NEW HAVEN, Conn. - The General Assembly is considering a bill that would remove barriers to employment for people with criminal records. Most job applications have a little box to check off to indicate that an applicant has a criminal conviction, and that's usually as far as the application goes.

Counting prisoners as local residents gives communities with prisons some extra representation in politics. (Sean Hobson/flickr)

HARTFORD, Conn. - A coalition of organizations wants Connecticut to end the practice of counting prisoners as residents of the towns where the prisons are located. It's known as "prison gerrymandering," and civil-rights advocates say it undermines the principle of "one person, one vote." Peter Wagn

Data shows Connecticut police fired stun guns at black and Hispanic suspects at higher rates than whites. (Junglecat/Wikimedia Commons)

HARTFORD, Conn. - Preliminary data shows racial disparities in the use of stun guns by police in Connecticut. Connecticut is the first state in the nation to account for the use of stun guns, or tasers, by law enforcement. Though an official report hasn't been issued, David McGuire, legislative an

Hundreds of Connecticut residents continue to languish in jail, often for minor offenses, because they can't afford bail. Credit: Daniel Schwen/Wikimedia Commons.

HARTFORD, Conn. – Governor Dannel Malloy says he wants the state to explore ways to reform the bail bond system in Connecticut. Nonviolent offenses like drug possession or even traffic tickets can land a person in jail. Once bail is set, release can often be secured for 10 percent or less of

Governor Malloy. Credit: Dannel Malloy/flickr.com

HARTFORD, Conn. – Gov. Dannel Malloy is proposing reforms to the state's juvenile justice system. He says the changes would put Connecticut far ahead of the rest of the country. Speaking at a Connecticut Law Review Symposium on Friday, the governor said he wants to build on his Second Cha

Nineteen states have abolished the death penalty. Credit: Florida Department of Corrections/Wikimedia.org

HARTFORD, Conn. - The Connecticut Supreme Court on Thursday ended efforts to revive the state's death penalty by rejecting a request to reconsider its August ruling that capital punishment is unconstitutional. Prosecutors had filed a motion to reargue the case, saying the majority opinion referred

Opponents of the death penalty say the 4-3 State Supreme Court decision abolishing Connecticut's death penalty adds weights to the growing national consensus against capital punishment. Credit: Florida Department of Corrections - Doug Smith

HARTFORD, Conn. – The State Supreme Court's 4 to 3 decision striking down Connecticut's death penalty has been called overreach by critics. But Robert Dunham, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center, says the court found the punishment violated the constitution in two ways.

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