Newscasts

PNS Daily News - November 22, 2019 


President Trump signs a spending bill to avert a government shutdown; it's deadline day for cities to opt out of a federal opioid settlement; and a new report says unsafe toys still are in stores.

2020Talks - November 22, 2019 


Affordable housing legislation was introduced in Congress yesterday, following the first debate questions about housing. Plus, Israeli PM Bibi Netanyahu was indicted for fraud, bribery, and breach of trust, just days after the Trump administration’s policy greenlighting Israeli settlement of the West Bank. And finally, former NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg continues his slow and steady potential entry into the race.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - FL: Livable Wages/Working Families

The intent of the 2001 Roadless Rule has been to provide lasting protection for inventoried roadless areas within the National Forest system, including several forests in Florida. (Pixabay)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - The Trump administration wants to reverse a nearly two-decade rule in order to allow more logging in Alaska's Tongass National Forest - and it's the same rule that protects national forests in Florida. Alaska's struggling timber industry hopes to revive large-scale industrial lo

Florida's minimum wage is set at $8.46 per hour. (Pixabay)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – The battle to raise Florida's and the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour continues. Orlando attorney, entrepreneur, and megadonor John Morgan is backing the group Florida for a Fair Wage, which is trying to put a $15 minimum-wage proposal on the ballot for the 2020 elect

Organizers of the #FreeCollegeNow bus tour say Floridians have a combined total of almost $80 billion in student loan debt. (Pixabay)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Adjunct or part-time professors from multiple states stop in Tampa today on their "#FreeCollegeNow" bus tour. The group is traveling through Florida cities asking voters to support political candidates who favor tuition-free college and student loan forgiveness. Organizer

The U.S. Supreme Court decision in Janus v. AFSCME is unlikely to have a direct impact on unionized employees of private businesses, because the First Amendment restricts government action and not private conduct. (Pixabay)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Opponents of Wednesday's U.S. Supreme Court ruling freeing government workers from having to pay into unions are using Florida as an example of how bad it could be for working families across the country. The court's 5-to-4 decision upends a 41-year-old ruling that allowe

Groups representing Florida workers are calling on Florida’s next governor to back the proposed 2020 $15 minimum wage ballot initiative. (Pixabay)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Groups representing workers say it has been years since they've had an ally in the governor's mansion – as such, they've unveiled "An Agenda for Florida's Workers," to serve as roadmap of priority issues for the legislature and incoming governor. This year's agenda

Lawmakers and concerned citizens return to the Florida State Capitol next Tuesday to kick off the 2018 legislative session. (Mark Goebel/Flickr)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Florida's Republican lawmakers have resurrected, and say they plan to fast-track, legislation from last year to weaken most labor unions in the state. Rich Templin, legislative and political director of the Florida AFL-CIO, which represents more than 500 labor union local

Volusia-Flagler AFL-CIO workers and labor advocates drop off community letters to lawmakers in opposition to HB 25. (AFL-CIO)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – A bill opponents describe as "union-busting" legislation meant to target Florida's public school teachers is back again after facing defeat in the Florida Legislature. Bills such as House Bill 25, by Republican Rep. Scott Plakon of Longwood, are being introduced in legisl

As the movement to transform higher education grows in Florida, a new report reveals the extent of faculty poverty.  (Pixabay)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – From skipping meals and having their utilities cut off to even delaying medical treatment, a survey of nearly 800 faculty members across Florida shows poverty is common among adjunct faculty at universities and colleges. The survey by the Service Employees International U

1 of 17 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »