Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 26, 2020 


University of California gets high marks for shelving standardized test scores during the pandemic; and the work-from-home trend could be a boon for people with disabilities.

2020Talks - May 26, 2020 


Monday was Memorial Day. More than 100,000 people in the five major U.S. territories are military veterans, but can't vote for commander-in-chief. Plus, Puerto Rico has a statehood referendum this November.

Public News Service - FL: Public Lands/Wilderness

The environmental group Speak Up Wekiva is going to court today to stop Florida's first bear hunt in 21 years. Credit: John Staton/iStockphoto.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Wildlife advocates are going before Florida's 2nd Judicial Circuit in Tallahassee today to ask Judge George Reynolds to halt Florida's first bear hunt in 21 years. The organization Speak Up Wekiva, named for the Wekiva River and nearby Wekiva Springs in Seminole County, sa

Protests began this weekend and culminate today against St. Augustine's 450th birthday celebration. Activists want an old fort and prison, the Castillo de San Marcos, torn down. Credit: Resist 450 Coalition

ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. - Advocates for the rights of indigenous peoples are protesting today in St. Augustine because the city is reenacting the landing, 450 years ago, of Spanish explorer Don Pedro Menendez de Aviles. Menendez's ship brought 800 passengers to establish the continent's first permanen

The public can weigh in this week on proposed restrictions on tourists swimming with endangered manatees at Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge in Citrus County. Credit: Durden Images/iStockphoto.com.

CRYSTAL RIVER, Fla. – The public can weigh in this week on strict new rules to limit the number of people who can swim with manatees at Three Sisters Springs in Crystal River. The U.S. Department of Fish and Wildlife holds two meetings this week – on Wednesday night for companies that r

Emissions from power plants continue to contribute to hazy skies and the effects of climate change. Being a sea level wetland, the Everglades stands to enjoy the most immediate benefits of the president's new Clean Power Plan. Credit: David Parsons/iStockphoto.com

FLORIDA CITY, Fla. – Environmentalists say Florida's national parks will enjoy considerable benefits from President Obama's new Clean Power Plan, which mandates significantly lower emissions at all coal-fired power plants. The air quality in Everglades National Park ranked the third worst of

A new poll says hunters and anglers support expanding the Clean Water Rule to smaller tributaries. Credit: bissel/iStock

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Hunters and anglers support restoring the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Water Rule to smaller headwaters streams and wetlands by a margin of more than 4 to 1, according to a new poll commissioned by the National Wildlife Federation on the so-called Waters of

An egret rests in a marsh in the Everglades. A Florida real estate company has filed for a permit to build an exploratory oil rig on land it owns near Miramar. Credit: Floridastock/iStockphoto.com.

Tallahassee, FL - Activists are blasting the idea of drilling for oil in the Everglades - after a longtime Florida firm, Kanter Real Estate, filed for a permit to allow oil exploration on land it owns near Miramar. Comments from Matthew Schwartz, executive director of the South Florida Wildlands Ass

An algae bloom on Christopher Creek exemplifies Florida's water quality issues, even as the state's attorney general is choosing to fight the EPA over clean water rules. Credit: Earthjustice.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - Florida's State Attorney General Pam Bondi is getting the state involved in clean water lawsuits lately and conservation groups contend she's on the wrong side of the issues. On Tuesday, a federal judge rejected a case by the American Farm Bureau Federation, that Bondi joined a

University of Florida research has found the state's rare frosted elfin butterfly population is threatened by controlled burns if those fires are not managed properly and holistically. Credit: Matt Thom, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Controlled burns could wipe out rare north Florida butterflies if they're not done with insect habitat in mind, according to a recent University of Florida study. The research found certain butterflies need fire because they feed on plants that only survive when flames wee

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