Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 16, 2019 


A judge rules on a controversial citizenship question for the 2020 Census; some fishing communities expect to feel the effects of the government shutdown; and new climate concerns as Antarctic ice is melting faster than we thought.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - ID: Climate Change/Air Quality

The area burned each year in the Northwest could quadruple by the 2080s if current temperature trends continue. (Kari Greer/U.S. Forest Service)

BOISE, Idaho – What can Idahoans do in the new year to help forests adapt to a changing climate? The National Climate Assessment released this year says there's a high probability that wildfires will continue to increase in the Northwest due to climate change. John Abatzoglou, a climate re

Algae blooms can be toxic for humans when ingested in large quantities. (Idaho Department of Environmental Quality)

CORRECTION: Idaho DEQ says no algae was found near Rexburg where a dog died after swimming last week. A previous version of this story stated algae caused the death. The dog's cause of death still is unknown. BOISE, Idaho – An environmental group is warning that toxic algae blooms are threat

Solarize the Valley has helped more than 100 Idahoan homeowners and businesses install solar panels. (SmitBruins/Twenty20)

BOISE, Idaho – A program to help Idahoans install rooftop solar is back just in time for the summer sun. The Snake River Alliance's Solarize the Valley project is heading into its third straight year of helping homeowners bring the power of the sun to their residences. After year two, the al

The Treasure Valley has about 2.4 million trees and room for twice that amount. (Mweston85/Wikimedia Commons)

BOISE, Idaho – Forests in the Treasure Valley are fighting climate change, according to a new report. In the report, The Nature Conservancy in Idaho and Ecosystem Sciences Foundation's Treasure Valley Forest Carbon Assessment looked at how much carbon dioxide trees in the region have been ab

Some Idaho school districts already have rigorous science standards for teaching climate change. (Idaho National Laboratory/Flickr)

BOISE, Idaho – Idaho lawmakers are holding public hearings Thursday and Friday on proposed science standards for Idaho public schools. At issue: how, or whether, those standards should address climate change. The past two years, legislators have rejected new science standards, which haven'

The number of Idahoans using solar power has doubled over the last two years. (IndianCkDish4/Flickr)

BOISE, Idaho – 2017 could be remembered as the year solar energy caught on in Idaho. If it does, it would be thanks in part to the Snake River Alliance, which launched Solarize the Valley 18 months ago. The program provides a low-cost solar panel installation and has helped 109 homes get pow

Cross-laminated timber, used in some buildings in place of steel, is seeing a growing market demand in the Northwest. (Denna Jones/Flickr)

BOISE, Idaho – Businesses, environmental groups and the timber industry are just a few of the diverse groups coming together for Idaho's first-ever statewide summit on climate change. "Safeguarding Idaho's Economy in a Changing Climate" is a two-day event that started Thursday. The goal is t

Beavers were nearly wiped out in the Northwest a century ago. (Yellowstone National Park/Flickr)

BOISE, Idaho – For Idaho and other parts of the West to fight drought and arid conditions, taking a cue from beavers might help. Thought to be a nuisance by some landowners, researchers are finding the dams that beavers build on creeks and rivers actually help restore them. Researchers des

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