Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 25, 2018 


The list of accusers against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh continues to swell. Also on the Tuesday rundown: Hurricane Florence SNAPs North Carolina to attention on the importance of food benefits; plus a new report says young parents need better supports.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - IL: Urban Planning/Transportation

Truck platooning is the linking of two or more trucks in convoy as a method of increasing the capacity of roads. (Pixabay)

CHICAGO – Advocates for new cruise-control technology for freight-hauling trucks say it could save money on fuel and consumer costs, but opponents of the technology believe it could put others on the road in danger. The system would allow "platooning," the term for freight trucks tailing each

The Environmental Defense Fund is encouraging the Illinois Department of Children and Families to require child-care facilities to identify whether they have a lead service line. (Pixabay)

CHICAGO – Even in small doses, lead is a harmful element to consume. The effects can be drastic for children still developing, which is why Illinois has proposed rules for childcare facilities on testing for lead in water. But some environmental advocates believe that the rules need to be adju

Dynegy Energy has asked for a $400 million bailout, saying that without it, thousands of local jobs will be lost. (nih.gov)

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – A new state report says Illinois has plenty of power, and environmental advocates say that means there's few reasons to bail out coal plants belonging to Dynegy. The company asked the Illinois Commerce Commission to relax some environmental protections that have been in pl

Electric vehicles reduce utility bills, vehicle expenses, and our reliance on fuel. (nrdc.org)

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – Illinois has had years of financial problems and many who live in the state have felt the pinch through higher taxes and reduced services, but a recent report says if the state embraced electric vehicles it could bring up to $43 billion in cumulative benefits by 2050. The

A new book calls for planners to think ahead about where solar and wind farms will go. (energy.gov)

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – As more Americans realize the need to transition from fossil fuel to renewable energy, there's a need to plan those changes carefully or environmentalists say we're just trading one problem for another. Joe Kiesecker, the lead scientist for the Nature Conservancy's Global

Many roads and bridges in Illinois and across the nation aren't as safe as they could be, but will money be allocated to fix them? (idot.gov)

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – While Illinois lawmakers continue to grapple with how to balance an overdue budget, they're being urged to keep the safety of the state's roads and bridges in mind. According to the latest report card by the American Society of Civil Engineers, there's a lot of work to be

A new report is calling for cities to invest in trees as a way to cut pollution and help keep temperatures cooler. (V. Carter)

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – A new report that looks at the impact that trees have on people’s health finds we need more trees. The Planting Healthy Air study from The Nature Conservancy examines the potential impact of planting trees in specific cities to lower heat and pollution, and how tha

Massive sand erosion is eating away at the wildlife habitat areas of Illinois' State Beach Park. A new regional plan aims to reverse that trend. (Illinois Department of Natural Resources)

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. -- The Lake Michigan shoreline along northern Illinois has a sand erosion problem that's hindering commercial shipping and threatening natural habitats, but there's a new plan to help. For about 200 years, man-made structures have been interrupting the southward drift of sand alo

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