Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 26, 2020 


University of California gets high marks for shelving standardized test scores during the pandemic; and the work-from-home trend could be a boon for people with disabilities.

2020Talks - May 26, 2020 


Monday was Memorial Day. More than 100,000 people in the five major U.S. territories are military veterans, but can't vote for commander-in-chief. Plus, Puerto Rico has a statehood referendum this November.

Public News Service - IN: Human Rights/Racial Justice

According to Governing.com, more than 9,800 DACA recipients live in Indiana. (Juan Monino/iStockphoto)

INDIANAPOLIS -- A decision on the fate of 700,000 so-called Dreamers could come down as soon as Thursday from the U.S. Supreme Court. The case examines whether the Trump administration lawfully terminated the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program in September 2017. Since then, courts ha

Senate Bill 12 would give Indiana courts discretion in deciding if bias-crime charges are warranted. (QuinceMedia/Pixabay)

INDIANAPOLIS – New research examines the complexities of crafting effective hate-crimes legislation. Senate Bill 12 in Indiana, now in the hands of a House committee, would allow a court to consider bias in imposing a criminal sentence. After examining data on bias-motivated homicides in the

Foster youth transitioning into adulthood may have trouble obtaining education, employment and housing. (ohurtsov/Pixabay)

INDIANAPOLIS — New research uncovers the instability faced by Indiana youth in foster care, and the resulting negative outcomes experienced during their transition to adulthood. Fostering Youth Transitions, a data brief released Tuesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, showed that moving in

A recent report projects the U.S. Supreme Court's Janus decision will cut wages for government employees and lead to a drop in U.S. economic activity of between $11.7 billion and $33.4 billion annually. (Flicker)

INDIANAPOLIS — On Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that non-union workers can't be forced to pay so-called fair share fees to help cover the costs of collective bargaining and other work carried out by public-sector unions. The decision is widely viewed as a potentially crippling

Indiana's Supreme Court justices will hear the concerns and suggestions of Hoosiers about race and gender bias in a series of discussions open to the public. (in.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS – Immigration issues, and accusations of race and gender bias, continue to be in the spotlight across the country. A series of forums to address those topics is being held around Indiana in the next few weeks, with the goal of gathering feedback for the state Supreme Court. Peopl

Those fighting to stop human trafficking say everyone needs to learn to spot the signs that a young person has fallen victim to the crime. (fbi.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - Human trafficking was put into the spotlight in Indiana during the Super Bowl of 2012 in Indianapolis when dozens of prostitutes were arrested and many told police they'd been forced into it. State Rep. Wendy McNamara says it opened a lot of eyes because many, herself included

Indiana's official language would become more gender neutral under a bill that's been approved by the House.

INDIANAPOLIS – Women elected to statewide office in Indiana get referred to as "he" in the laws that spell out their duties. Some female lawmakers are now seeking to change that. When State Auditor Suzanne Crouch took office in 2013 she noticed her job description read "he" or "his." She s

More than one-third of Indiana's counties are now participating in the Juvenile Detention Alternative Initiative, which gives judges more choice in sentencing young people. (Cynthia Carter)

INDIANAPOLIS - Indiana Supreme Court Justice Steven David calls the Juvenile Detention Alternative Initiative the "greatest reform" he's ever seen and now, one-third of Indiana's counties are participating. The Annie E. Casey Foundation model is based on the assumption that sometimes, a young per

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