Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 22, 2018 


The Department of Justice bows to Trump demands – at least, in part. Also on the rundown: the latest Supreme Court ruling deemed a blow to worker’s rights; plus a solar program back by popular demand.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - IN: Animal Welfare

PHOTO: An IU Law professor is questioning the constitutionality of Indiana’s so-called Ag-Gag bill - a measure supporters say will protect farmers from exploitation by activist groups.

INDIANAPOLIS - An Indiana University law professor is questioning the constitutionality of Indiana's so-called Ag-Gag bill, a measure supporters claim will protect farmers from exploitation by activist groups. Senate Bill 373 will be heard next on the floor of the Indiana House after passing a com

PHOTO: A bill before the Indiana legislature is trying to keep people from photographing or filming on farms without permission. Watch dog groups oppose it saying that it would hinder their efforts for public safety.

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - Senate Bill 373 - the so-called "Ag Gag" bill - is meant to keep people from videotaping or photographing on farms or businesses without prior permission from the owner. The bill's author, Sen. Travis Holdman (R-Dist. 19), said its purpose is to protect Hoosier businesses from b

PHOTO: Bats get a bad rap, but farmers need them.

INDIANAPOLIS - Over the past several years, a fungus causing a disease called white nose syndrome has killed up to 6.7 million bats in North America. It was first documented in Indiana in January of 2011 and is now present in at least eight counties. The Indiana Bat, a species first discovered in

INDIANAPOLIS - Indiana's Water Pollution Control Board has updated rules and regulations for the kinds of large livestock farms known as CAFOs and CFOs: concentrated animal feeding operations and confined feeding operations respectively. Indiana environmental organizations are concerned that the u

INDIANAPOLIS - Indiana has an excess of unwanted horses. Horse rescue facilities are 'maxed out,' people say they can't afford to feed them, and the animals grow old or become ill. Dr. Tim Bartlett, director of equine programs for the Indiana Board of Animal Health, says several equine organizatio

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