Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 22, 2019 


President Trump rattles the Middle East, saying the U.S. will recognize Israel’s authority over the Golan Heights. Also on our Friday rundown: A judge blocks laws limiting the power of the new Wisconsin governor. Plus, momentum builds across party lines to abolish the death penalty.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - IN: Hunger/Food/Nutrition

More than 600,000 people in Indiana rely on food assistance through SNAP to put food on the table. (USDA)

INDIANAPOLIS — With the federal government shutdown in its fourth week, state and federal leaders, along with hunger-fighting groups, are working to ensure struggling Hoosiers are able to put food on the table. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Indiana Family and

Food banks say making SNAP benefits harder to get could increase demand at food pantries. (American Heart Association)

INDIANAPOLIS – A U.S. House and Senate conference committee is finalizing a huge farm bill. And state and national hunger groups want folks to speak up about how the competing bills handle food programs. Emily Weikert Bryant, executive director of the group Feeding Indiana's Hungry, says the

States that have tried adding tighter work requirements to SNAP programs report more families showing up at food pantries. (Pixabay)

INDIANAPOLIS – Possible changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) now under debate in Congress could overwhelm the faith groups that run some of Indiana's hunger fighting programs. Rules added to SNAP under a proposal in the House could include much tighter income and w

Food pantries in Indiana say proposed changes could get in the way of feeding children and families. (Pixabay)

INDIANAPOLIS – Changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) now under debate in Congress could trigger what observers and a new report say is an explosion of red tape and bureaucracy for Indiana. Rules added to SNAP, formerly food stamps, could include much tighter income

Lower-income families often are faced with paying utility bills or buying food. (Juan Esteban Zapata)

INDIANAPOLIS – About a third of Hoosiers are often at risk of going hungry, but they aren't eligible for federal food assistance. According to the latest Map the Meal Gap report, 31 percent of state residents who are food insecure can't qualify for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Progr

The federal budget plan would reduce money to the main food-assistance program in the country. (usda.gov)

SOUTH BEND, Ind. – Many of us ate too much, spent more than we should have and ended up with gifts we don't even need this holiday season. But there are also many Hoosiers who struggle every day, including through the holidays. Food bank workers say, while donations go up at this time of the

Hoosiers aren't always able to get meat when they visit local food pantries. (feedingindianashungry.org)

INDIANAPOLIS – There is a way for Hoosiers who love the outdoors to help those who don't have enough to eat during the holidays. Hunters often spend sunrise to sunset stalking deer for sport and for food, and many end up with more than they need. The Indiana Department of Natural Resources

More than 300,000 Indiana children live in households considered food insecure. (V. Carter)

INDIANAPOLIS – While the number of people applying for federal nutrition assistance has dropped slightly in Indiana, more than 14 percent of Hoosiers are still living in poverty, according to the latest report from the U.S. Census Bureau. More than 950,000 are food insecure – meaning

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