Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 19, 2019 


Chants of a different sort greet U.S. Rep. Omar upon her return home to Minnesota. Also on our Friday rundown: A new report says gunshot survivors need more outreach, support. Plus, sharing climate-change perspectives in Charlotte.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - IN: Rural/Farming

PHOTO: The FAA is expected to release draft regulations soon for commercial use of drones for businesses, researchers and government agencies. Photo credit: Dkroetsch/morguefile.

INDIANAPOLIS – The use of small drones is limited to hobbyists and a small number of government agencies, researchers and businesses, but that could soon change. The Federal Aviation Administration is expected to release new rules by the end of the year. Dick Honneywell, executive director

PHOTO: Farming can be a hazardous profession, but an annual report from Purdue University finds a continued downward trend in fatal accidents on Indiana farms. Photo credit: Jack Dykinga, U.S.Dept. of Agriculture.

INDIANAPOLIS - Farming is becoming a safer profession in Indiana, and technology improvements may be the reason. Deaths reported at Indiana farming operations were down in 2013, according to the Indiana Farm Fatality Summary from Purdue University. It documented 18 deaths from farm-related accident

PHOTO: New University of Indiana research has found that most temporary workers from Mexico who get work visas are no better off than those who are undocumented. Photo credit: Bread for the World/Flickr.

INDIANAPOLIS - Immigrants from Mexico can fill the gap where there's a need for agricultural or low-skilled work in Indiana and other states. However, a new study finds little benefit for those who legally obtain a temporary worker visa. Indiana University researcher Lauren Apgar found that tempora

PHOTO: Purdue professor Cary Mitchell and other researchers developed a technique that could allow some crops to be grown in caves or mines. Photo courtesy of Purdue University.

INDIANAPOLIS – Forget the field – caves and mines could hold the future of farming. Researchers from Purdue University have discovered that lowering temperatures for two hours each day reduces the height of corn crops without affecting their seed yield. It's a technique that could be us

James Benham joined the new Indiana Agricultural Council with HSUS. Photo Courtesy of James Benham.

VERSAILLES, Ind. – Indiana is the seventh state to join forces with the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) to form an agricultural council, designed to bring local farmers together with the Society to provide guidance and help foster better practices. James Benham, president of the In

PHOTO: A fast-moving virus has infected hogs in 43 of the state's counties and caused significant mortality. Photo credit: morgue file.

INDIANAPOLIS - Indiana's pork industry is facing a significant challenge. A quick-moving virus has infected hogs in nearly half of the state's counties since it was discovered in the United States in May of last year. Dr. Bret Marsh, Indiana's State Veterinarian, described the disease that results -

PHOTO: Carrie Vollmer-Sanders of Indiana was honored as a

WASHINGTON – An Indiana woman's efforts to protect Lake Erie from fertilizer runoff have won her a special distinction. President Barack Obama this week honored Carrie Vollmer-Sanders of Angola and 13 others from across the nation as Champions of Change, which highlights ordinary Americans d

PHOTO: A hearing will be held today on Senate Bill 101, which could make felons out of whistleblowers exposing unethical or illegal activities on industrial farms. Photo courtesy of Kathleen Schatzmann.

INDIANAPOLIS - So-called "Ag-gag" legislation is once again on the table at the Indiana State House. A hearing will be held today on Senate Bill 101, which could make felons of whistle-blowers exposing unethical or illegal activities on industrial farms. According to Matthew Dominguez, policy mana

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