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PNS Daily Newscast - July 18, 2018 


Trump now says he misspoke as he stood side-by-side with Putin. Also on the Wednesday rundown: A Senate committee looks at the latest attempt to weaken the Endangered Species Act; and public input is being sought on Great Lakes restoration.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - IN: Budget Policy & Priorities

Nearly half of all students at Indiana's public four-year college campuses graduate on time. (Pixabay)

INDIANAPOLIS – Indiana is making progress in moving the needle on college completion, according to state education officials. The 2018 College Completion Report, released this week, reveals an increase of 14 percentage points over the past five years in the number of college students graduati

States that have tried adding tighter work requirements to SNAP programs report more families showing up at food pantries. (Pixabay)

INDIANAPOLIS – Possible changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) now under debate in Congress could overwhelm the faith groups that run some of Indiana's hunger fighting programs. Rules added to SNAP under a proposal in the House could include much tighter income and w

Food pantries in Indiana say proposed changes could get in the way of feeding children and families. (Pixabay)

INDIANAPOLIS – Changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) now under debate in Congress could trigger what observers and a new report say is an explosion of red tape and bureaucracy for Indiana. Rules added to SNAP, formerly food stamps, could include much tighter income

Lower-income families often are faced with paying utility bills or buying food. (Juan Esteban Zapata)

INDIANAPOLIS – About a third of Hoosiers are often at risk of going hungry, but they aren't eligible for federal food assistance. According to the latest Map the Meal Gap report, 31 percent of state residents who are food insecure can't qualify for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Progr

The State of Indiana considers interest rates on loans above 72 percent felony loansharking. (wa.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS — Advocates for lower-income Hoosiers are celebrating the defeat of a payday-lending bill in the Indiana Legislature. House Bill 1319, which passed in the House earlier this month, would have allowed payday lenders to charge interest on small loans at rates more than triple what

Advocates are asking for more oversight of confined animal feeding operations. (hecweb.org)

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana lawmakers will consider several bills that are important to the environment this legislative session. They cover solar, state forests, safe drinking water and factory-farm pollution. Tim Maloney, senior policy director with the Hoosier Environmental Council, said there

Many Hoosiers still haven't recovered from the stall in the economy a few years ago. (Virginia Carter)

INDIANAPOLIS – A coalition representing 25 different groups in Indiana is speaking out against a congressional tax plan that could be approved this week. The Indiana Coalition for Human Services says the plan being considered by the U.S. Senate would likely force deep cuts to programs that e

About 286,000 Hoosiers say they have engaged in non-medical use of opioid pain relievers. (cdc.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS -- Now that President Donald Trump has declared the nation’s opioid crisis a public health emergency, those working the front lines want to see an actual increase in funding. Last week the president promised to loosen regulations and increase flexibility on funding for states. H

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