Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - December 11, 2018 


The U.S. support of fossil fuels is met with protests and laughter at the UN climate conference. Also, on the Tuesday rundown: we take you to a major city with a look at how segregation impacts life outcomes. Plus, efforts to aid more veteran farmers.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - IN: Water

Environmental groups say water quality control standards for the Ohio River are crucial for Indiana, given its position downstream. (Ken Lund/Flickr)

INDIANAPOLIS – A vote this week will determine if Indiana and other states will lose some pollution control standards for the Ohio River. The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission, known as ORSANCO, has provided oversight of pollution levels in the river for more than seven decades.

USDA financing can help small Indiana cities and towns refurbish their current water infrastructure systems or build new facilities. (Pixabay)

INDIANAPOLIS – August is Water Quality Month, and cities and towns throughout Indiana with water or waste problems to tackle have an opportunity to get some financial help. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Water and Waste Disposal Loan and Grant program is offering funding for rural comm

Hidden dangers when swimming in open water include currents, vegetation, rocks and sudden drop-offs. (Pixabay)<br />

INDIANAPOLIS - As the warmer weather sets in and folks in Indiana look for ways to cool off, a new report highlights the dangers of swimming in open water. The research released Tuesday by the group Safe Kids Worldwide shows about 1,000 children die in drowning accidents each year in the United Stat

Advocates are asking for more oversight of confined animal feeding operations. (hecweb.org)

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana lawmakers will consider several bills that are important to the environment this legislative session. They cover solar, state forests, safe drinking water and factory-farm pollution. Tim Maloney, senior policy director with the Hoosier Environmental Council, said there

Plastic waste is broken down by currents and sunlight and is often ingested by wildlife. (usgs.gov)

MICHIGAN CITY, Ind. – Clean-water advocates say they’re are hoping 2018 will be a year of better water quality in the Great Lakes and oceans. Carolyn Box, science program director at 5 Gyres, warns that by the year 2050, there will be more plastic in the water than fish, with 95 percen

Volunteers tag Monarchs though programs sponsored by the Indiana Wildlife Federation. (indianawildlife.org)

INDIANAPOLIS -- An effort to save Indiana's waterways is under way. It's part of a push by the National Wildlife Federation to combat negative impacts under budget cuts proposed by the Trump administration. The agency is conducting a campaign to educate people about what decreases in funding for h

A panel is taking public testimony to determine if legislation is needed to regulate factory farms. (usda.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS — The question of what to do about runoff from concentrated animal-feeding operations, known as CAFOs, continues to be a topic of debate in Indiana. Environmental groups and farming activists have clashed over how much regulation the industry needs, and a public hearing on the top

Coal ash from the bottom of the Dan River near the site of Duke Energy's spill. (Sierra Club)

INDIANAPOLIS — Duke Energy has a plan to dispose of millions of gallons of coal ash waste, but environmental groups are asking policy makers to reject it, saying it poses a health hazard. Indiana is requiring Duke to prepare closure plans for 20 coal ash lagoons, many of which are leaking an

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