Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 17, 2018 


Trump says he is not buying U.S. intelligence as he meets with Putin. Also on the rundown: as harvest nears farmers speak out on tariffs; immigrant advocates say families should not be kept in cages; and a call for a deeper dive to the Lake Erie algae troubles.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - IN: Family/Father Issues

Lower-income families often are faced with paying utility bills or buying food. (Juan Esteban Zapata)

INDIANAPOLIS – About a third of Hoosiers are often at risk of going hungry, but they aren't eligible for federal food assistance. According to the latest Map the Meal Gap report, 31 percent of state residents who are food insecure can't qualify for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Progr

Many babies die in Indiana because they're born pre-term or because of unsafe sleeping practices. (Carrie Cain)

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana's infant mortality rate is dismal, and advocates hope a new law signed by the governor will be a step towards lowering those numbers. Legislation guaranteeing consistent levels of care for all Hoosier mothers and infants goes into effect July 1. SB 360 creates a system

Last January, the official point-in-time count of homeless people totaled about 5,500 in Indiana (V. Carter)

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. – Cold weather continues to grip much of the Midwest, and thousands of people don't have a warm place to stay on a regular basis. The federal government does an annual homeless count each year, and on one night in 2017, it found about 5,500 people on the streets in Indiana.

The federal budget plan would reduce money to the main food-assistance program in the country. (usda.gov)

SOUTH BEND, Ind. – Many of us ate too much, spent more than we should have and ended up with gifts we don't even need this holiday season. But there are also many Hoosiers who struggle every day, including through the holidays. Food bank workers say, while donations go up at this time of the

Indiana has the nation's sixth highest wage gap between men and women. (in.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS – The wage gap between men and women in Indiana has grown again, and that gap in the Hoosier State is now sixth highest in the nation. A report called "Wages, Wealth and Poverty" found the difference in pay in the Hoosier State is 26 percent. Erin Macey, policy analyst for the

Hoosier schools are becoming more educationally and culturally diverse. (Juan Esteban Zapata)

INDIANAPOLIS – As schools in Indiana become more educationally and culturally diverse, educators say there's a growing need to reach out to parents who may not be familiar with the American education system, or the English language. The Indiana Youth Institute sponsored workshops this past w

Of the 1.5 million children living in the Hoosier State, thousands are in need of foster or adoptive homes. (cdc.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS — As the number of children in foster care in Indiana continues to increase, the 2017 Because Kids Count conference in downtown Indianapolis will bring experts together next week to discuss the problem. One of the event’s keynote speakers is intimately connected to the iss

More than 300,000 Indiana children live in households considered food insecure. (V. Carter)

INDIANAPOLIS – While the number of people applying for federal nutrition assistance has dropped slightly in Indiana, more than 14 percent of Hoosiers are still living in poverty, according to the latest report from the U.S. Census Bureau. More than 950,000 are food insecure – meaning

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