Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 21, 2018 


President Donald Trump reverses course on some aspects of his border policy. Also on the Thursday rundown: With midterms approaching, we take you to a state that you might not expect to be reaching out to Latino voters; and reporter Dan Heyman has a novel angle on the utility of medical marijuana

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - IN: Youth Issues

Hidden dangers when swimming in open water include currents, vegetation, rocks and sudden drop-offs. (Pixabay)<br />

INDIANAPOLIS - As the warmer weather sets in and folks in Indiana look for ways to cool off, a new report highlights the dangers of swimming in open water. The research released Tuesday by the group Safe Kids Worldwide shows about 1,000 children die in drowning accidents each year in the United Stat

Millennials are twice as likely to experience eye trouble when they reach their 50s and 60s. (cdc.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS – This is Healthy Vision Month, and more than 23 million adults have never had an eye checkup. Even though there may be nothing noticeably wrong with your vision, some health problems that cause eye disease don't have any early warning signs. Dr. Rachel Bishop, chief of consul

Studies show dogs can help relieve anxiety and stress in humans. (pawsandthink.org)

INDIANAPOLIS – You may have seen therapy dogs at airports comforting passengers who have anxiety about flying, or at a local nursing home or hospital, but they're also being used in school settings in the wake of tragedy. Paws and Think is a Hoosier nonprofit organization that has 120 teams

Kids may react negatively to extreme stress because of other things that are bothering them, or because they don't know how to express how they feel. (nih.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS – As the nation still reels from the latest school massacre, young people are making their voices heard – in both good and bad ways. Many students are speaking out about the availability of guns and what they want lawmakers to do about it. Nancy Lindhjem, a school psycho

One in 10 Hoosier kids reportedly lives with someone who's dealing with substance abuse. (in.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS – The latest KIDS COUNT Data Book for Indiana is out, and it shows the state has made some strides, but the Indiana Youth Institute says there's still a big problem that needs to be addressed. The group's president, Tami Silverman, says the impact the opioid epidemic is having o

Of the 1.5 million children living in the Hoosier State, thousands are in need of foster or adoptive homes. (cdc.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS — As the number of children in foster care in Indiana continues to increase, the 2017 Because Kids Count conference in downtown Indianapolis will bring experts together next week to discuss the problem. One of the event’s keynote speakers is intimately connected to the iss

Many Hoosier families can't afford the growing cost of sending kids to college. (Tatiyana Carter)

INDIANAPOLIS -- Many parents struggle every month to make payments for their child's education, and every year the cost of college goes up. That means many young people never get the opportunity to go on past high school. Tuition plus fees at four-year public colleges jumped by more than 70 percen

If you know someone who strives to make life better for Indiana young people, nominate him or her for a youth worker award by Aug. 14. (B. Gelwick)

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. – Many people work tirelessly to make life better for youth in Indiana, and one of those individuals will be honored with the 2017 D. Susan Wisely Youth Worker of the Year Award. Laura Ingram, program director for the Pride Prism Youth Community in Bloomington, is a therapi

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