Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - October 19, 2018 


Senator Corker demands the Trump administration share intelligence on the killing of a Washington Post columnist. Also on the Friday rundown: groups sue over the Texas border wall plan; and the soggy summer in some states may lead to higher pumpkin prices for Halloween.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - IN: Poverty Issues

Food banks say making SNAP benefits harder to get could increase demand at food pantries. (American Heart Association)

INDIANAPOLIS – A U.S. House and Senate conference committee is finalizing a huge farm bill. And state and national hunger groups want folks to speak up about how the competing bills handle food programs. Emily Weikert Bryant, executive director of the group Feeding Indiana's Hungry, says the

States that have tried adding tighter work requirements to SNAP programs report more families showing up at food pantries. (Pixabay)

INDIANAPOLIS – Possible changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) now under debate in Congress could overwhelm the faith groups that run some of Indiana's hunger fighting programs. Rules added to SNAP under a proposal in the House could include much tighter income and w

Food pantries in Indiana say proposed changes could get in the way of feeding children and families. (Pixabay)

INDIANAPOLIS – Changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) now under debate in Congress could trigger what observers and a new report say is an explosion of red tape and bureaucracy for Indiana. Rules added to SNAP, formerly food stamps, could include much tighter income

Lower-income families often are faced with paying utility bills or buying food. (Juan Esteban Zapata)

INDIANAPOLIS – About a third of Hoosiers are often at risk of going hungry, but they aren't eligible for federal food assistance. According to the latest Map the Meal Gap report, 31 percent of state residents who are food insecure can't qualify for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Progr

Many babies die in Indiana because they're born pre-term or because of unsafe sleeping practices. (Carrie Cain)

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana's infant mortality rate is dismal, and advocates hope a new law signed by the governor will be a step towards lowering those numbers. Legislation guaranteeing consistent levels of care for all Hoosier mothers and infants goes into effect July 1. SB 360 creates a system

The State of Indiana considers interest rates on loans above 72 percent felony loansharking. (wa.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS — Advocates for lower-income Hoosiers are celebrating the defeat of a payday-lending bill in the Indiana Legislature. House Bill 1319, which passed in the House earlier this month, would have allowed payday lenders to charge interest on small loans at rates more than triple what

Last January, the official point-in-time count of homeless people totaled about 5,500 in Indiana (V. Carter)

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. – Cold weather continues to grip much of the Midwest, and thousands of people don't have a warm place to stay on a regular basis. The federal government does an annual homeless count each year, and on one night in 2017, it found about 5,500 people on the streets in Indiana.

One in 10 Hoosier kids reportedly lives with someone who's dealing with substance abuse. (in.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS – The latest KIDS COUNT Data Book for Indiana is out, and it shows the state has made some strides, but the Indiana Youth Institute says there's still a big problem that needs to be addressed. The group's president, Tami Silverman, says the impact the opioid epidemic is having o

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