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PNS Daily Newscast - January 28, 2020 


Testimony could be in play at the Trump impeachment trial. And are less strict emission standards at odds with consumers?

2020Talks - January 28, 2020 


Voters talked about "electability." What does it really mean? Democratic candidates have varying approaches, from courting Obama to Trump voters to mobilizing as many voters as possible.

Public News Service - KY: Water

The EPA's Science Advisory Board is an independent panel tasked each year with reviewing the agency's proposed changes to rules and regulations. (Adobe Stock)<br />

FRANKFORT, Ky. -- An independent panel of scientists convenes this week to review rule changes proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency. Critics say the changes could weaken protections of waterways across the country, restrict the use of scientific studies needed to create environmental regu

Many rural areas in the United States still lack access to basic running water, according to a report by the U.S. Water Alliance. (Adobe Stock)

FRANKFORT, Ky. — Some communities are being left behind when it comes to access to running water and indoor plumbing, including parts of rural Appalachia. That's according to a new report by the U.S. Water Alliance, which found more than 2 million people across the country lack these services.

Chemicals called PFAs, known as emerging contaminants, were detected in 81 municipal water treatment plants in Kentucky. (Adobe Stock)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Chemicals called PFAS (short for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) have been found in Kentucky's drinking water. Known as emerging contaminants, PFAS are found in the Teflon in non-stick cookware, food bags, some brands of dental floss and in fire fighting foam. There i

The Ohio River is 981 miles long and supplies drinking water to more than 5 million people. (Adobe Stock)

COVINGTON, Ky. - The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission is slated to vote on loosening water-pollution regulations at its meeting this week in Covington. The proposed changes would give states the ability to opt out of pollution-control standards for the Ohio River, which supplies drinki

According to a new report, 91 percent of U.S. coal-fired power plants are contaminating nearby groundwater with unsafe levels of toxic pollutants. (Jellybeens4/Twenty20)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – A power plant outside of Louisville ranks among the top 10 most polluted in the country for groundwater contamination by coal ash, according to a new report. Coal ash is the toxic leftover byproduct of burning coal, and coal plants produce millions of tons of it each year.

The deepest point of the Ohio River runs through Louisville, Ky. (William Aden/Flickr)

FRANKFORT, Ky. — A long-awaited vote is expected this week on the future of water-quality standards that impact nearly two-thirds of Kentucky's waterways. The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission is reconsidering its role in setting limits on pollution discharges in the river. The a

Kentuckians fighting pollution flowing into the Green River are concerned that weakened Clean Water Act protections could hurt their case. (PatrickRohe/Flickr)

FRANKFORT, Ky. — Some Kentuckians are concerned that proposed changes to the Clean Water Act could set back the fight against waste and pollution in their own backyards. The Environmental Protection Agency has announced a replacement for the Waters of the United States rule, lifting federal

Martin County's 10,000 residents never know day to day if their water will be usable. (Tante Tati/Pixabay)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Clean water flowing from the tap still is a luxury for many residents of Martin County who continue to experience the ripple effects of a 2000 coal slurry spill. Nina McCoy, chair of Martin County Concerned Citizens, says the disaster uncovered the water company's deteriorat

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