Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - October 21, 2019 


G-7 meeting may move to Camp David; conservation groups sound alarm about acting BLM chief; NC suit aims to change solitary confinement policy there; questions about Amazon Ring coordination with police; and microbes might help in earthquakes.

2020Talks - October 21, 2019 


2016 candidate Hillary Clinton says Russia is "grooming" Rep. Tulsi Gabbard for a third-party run. And Sen. Bernie Sanders has biggest Democratic campaign event this season so far.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - KY: Water

The Ohio River is 981 miles long and supplies drinking water to more than 5 million people. (Adobe Stock)

COVINGTON, Ky. - The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission is slated to vote on loosening water-pollution regulations at its meeting this week in Covington. The proposed changes would give states the ability to opt out of pollution-control standards for the Ohio River, which supplies drinki

According to a new report, 91 percent of U.S. coal-fired power plants are contaminating nearby groundwater with unsafe levels of toxic pollutants. (Jellybeens4/Twenty20)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – A power plant outside of Louisville ranks among the top 10 most polluted in the country for groundwater contamination by coal ash, according to a new report. Coal ash is the toxic leftover byproduct of burning coal, and coal plants produce millions of tons of it each year.

The deepest point of the Ohio River runs through Louisville, Ky. (William Aden/Flickr)

FRANKFORT, Ky. — A long-awaited vote is expected this week on the future of water-quality standards that impact nearly two-thirds of Kentucky's waterways. The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission is reconsidering its role in setting limits on pollution discharges in the river. The a

Kentuckians fighting pollution flowing into the Green River are concerned that weakened Clean Water Act protections could hurt their case. (PatrickRohe/Flickr)

FRANKFORT, Ky. — Some Kentuckians are concerned that proposed changes to the Clean Water Act could set back the fight against waste and pollution in their own backyards. The Environmental Protection Agency has announced a replacement for the Waters of the United States rule, lifting federal

Martin County's 10,000 residents never know day to day if their water will be usable. (Tante Tati/Pixabay)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Clean water flowing from the tap still is a luxury for many residents of Martin County who continue to experience the ripple effects of a 2000 coal slurry spill. Nina McCoy, chair of Martin County Concerned Citizens, says the disaster uncovered the water company's deteriorat

Acidic water runoff from coal mine land in eastern Kentucky. (Ilovemountains.org/Flickr)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Kentucky's coal country could get new life under legislation on Capitol Hill. A group of concerned citizens and organizations gathers today at the Lexington office of U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., to encourage his action to pass the RECLAIM Act (HR 1731). The bill would r

Support for groups that fight for clean air and water, and other conservation concerns, has grown among Kentuckians since the 2016 election. (Greg Stotelmyer)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Kentucky's signature conservation groups are reporting an uptick in membership, fund-raising and volunteerism. The increased engagement comes as President Donald Trump charts an aggressive path toward environmental deregulation, including pulling the U.S. out of the Paris cl

Conservationists are fighting back against attempts to gut new regulations that attempt to stop future pollution of streams such as this one that spills into the Kentucky River. (Tarence Ray)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – A coalition of community and conservation groups is fighting back against attempts by state officials in Kentucky and 13 other coal-producing states to stop enforcement of the Stream Protection Rule, which was finalized last month by the Interior Department. The states want t

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