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PNS Daily News - December 6, 2019 


A Trump impeachment vote in the House could come before Christmas; students rally for climate action again today; and other-abled workers fuel a vertical farm in Wyoming.

2020Talks - December 6, 2019 


Impeachment is ramping up, and so is Iowa campaigning and Democratic endorsements. 2004 Democratic nominee John Kerry endorsed former VP Joe Biden, Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement endorsed Sen. Bernie Sanders, and VoteVets endorsed Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

Public News Service - KY: Civil Rights

Each year, more than 1 million people default on their student loans, according to the U.S. Department of Education. (Adobe Stock)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Nearly 25% of federal student loan borrowers default within five years of starting the repayment process, according to a new report by The Pew Charitable Trusts. Most of those borrowers showed signs of financial distress almost immediately when it came time to start repaying

Kentucky, Louisiana and Mississippi will hold gubernatorial elections Tuesday. (Adobe Stock)

FRANKFORT, Ky. — On Tuesday, Kentuckians will cast their ballots for the next governor. And as the rest of the country will be watching for the outcome, state officials say they will be taking complaints on Election Day seriously. State Attorney General Michael J. Brown said his office has s

More than 1.2 million people in Kentucky, or 22% of the state's population, are covered by Medicaid, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. (Adobe Stock)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – On Friday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for Washington, D.C., will hear oral arguments in a case concerning Gov. Matt Bevin's changes to Kentucky's Medicaid program, known as Kentucky HEALTH. Earlier this year, a federal judge blocked the new rules, which would have required Me

A preschool classroom in Kentucky learns about Constitution Day. (Kentucky Youth Advocates)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – Kentucky school districts want to make sure their students are counted when the 2020 census begins in April. Educators are gearing up to spread the word to parents and communities about the counting of every resident in the nation. Michelle Elison, a Louisville-based part

The agrotourism organization Black Soil: Our Better Nature aims to reconnect black Kentuckians to their legacy and heritage in agriculture. (Tehran Jewell, owner and operator of A Taste of Jewell Farm/AgZinger)

LEXINGTON, Ky. — Women and minority farmers are consistently denied agricultural loans, according to a report released this month by the U.S. Government Accountability Office. Farmers and ranchers rely on loans to buy land and purchase supplies and equipment. Most farmers in need of cash app

Kentucky spends about $10 million annually on death-penalty court proceedings, according to the state's Department of Public Advocacy. (Adobe Stock)

FRANKFORT, Ky. — A Franklin County judge has ruled the state's protocol for carrying out the death penalty is unconstitutional. The ruling by Judge Phillip Shepherd came in response to a case filed by a group of death-row inmates, who argued corrections department regulations don't protect peo

New research suggests that Kentucky's cash bail policies in some counties contribute to jail overcrowding and strain county budgets. (Adobe Stock)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Where you live in Kentucky might determine whether you stay in jail before trial because you can't afford the cash bail, according to a new report from the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. Researchers found the number of people released from jail before their trial witho

Cast and crew of the Kentucky storytelling project

LEXINGTON, Ky. – A grassroots storytelling production focused on women's experiences with abortion performs its final show of the season Thursday night in Lexington. A few years ago, when Kentucky was left with only one abortion provider after a Lexington clinic closed, Stacie Sexton started

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