Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - October 17, 2019 


President Trump puts some distance between himself and policy on Syria. Also on the rundown: South Dakota awaits a SCOTUS ruling on the insanity defense, plus the focus remains on election security for 2020.

2020Talks - October 17, 2019 


Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar, two members of the Squad, endorsed Sen. Bernie Sanders. Plus, some candidates are spending more than they're raising.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - KY: Civil Rights

More than 1.2 million people in Kentucky, or 22% of the state's population, are covered by Medicaid, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. (Adobe Stock)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – On Friday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for Washington, D.C., will hear oral arguments in a case concerning Gov. Matt Bevin's changes to Kentucky's Medicaid program, known as Kentucky HEALTH. Earlier this year, a federal judge blocked the new rules, which would have required Me

A preschool classroom in Kentucky learns about Constitution Day. (Kentucky Youth Advocates)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – Kentucky school districts want to make sure their students are counted when the 2020 census begins in April. Educators are gearing up to spread the word to parents and communities about the counting of every resident in the nation. Michelle Elison, a Louisville-based part

The agrotourism organization Black Soil: Our Better Nature aims to reconnect black Kentuckians to their legacy and heritage in agriculture. (Tehran Jewell, owner and operator of A Taste of Jewell Farm/AgZinger)

LEXINGTON, Ky. — Women and minority farmers are consistently denied agricultural loans, according to a report released this month by the U.S. Government Accountability Office. Farmers and ranchers rely on loans to buy land and purchase supplies and equipment. Most farmers in need of cash app

Kentucky spends about $10 million annually on death-penalty court proceedings, according to the state's Department of Public Advocacy. (Adobe Stock)

FRANKFORT, Ky. — A Franklin County judge has ruled the state's protocol for carrying out the death penalty is unconstitutional. The ruling by Judge Phillip Shepherd came in response to a case filed by a group of death-row inmates, who argued corrections department regulations don't protect peo

New research suggests that Kentucky's cash bail policies in some counties contribute to jail overcrowding and strain county budgets. (Adobe Stock)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Where you live in Kentucky might determine whether you stay in jail before trial because you can't afford the cash bail, according to a new report from the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. Researchers found the number of people released from jail before their trial witho

Cast and crew of the Kentucky storytelling project

LEXINGTON, Ky. – A grassroots storytelling production focused on women's experiences with abortion performs its final show of the season Thursday night in Lexington. A few years ago, when Kentucky was left with only one abortion provider after a Lexington clinic closed, Stacie Sexton started

A 2016 poll found that about 70 percent of Kentuckians agree the capital-punishment system risks executing the innocent. (@annie29/Twenty20)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Thirty lawmakers from all sides of the political spectrum are co-sponsoring a bill to abolish the death penalty in Kentucky. While House Bill 115 languishes in the House Judiciary Committee, supporters say the high number of sponsors indicates views on capital punishment in

The Kentucky State Penitentiary complex in Eddyville, Ky., holds more than 850 people and has been in operation since the 1880s. (Wikimedia Commons)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Researchers are following 230 Kentuckians who either are incarcerated or have recently been released, as part of a national program designed to help people transition back into society after serving their time. By working with local corrections departments and community-base

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