Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 19, 2019 


A look at some of the big takeaways from the release of the redacted Mueller report. Also, on our Friday rundown: Iowa recovers from devastating floods and prepares for more. And, scallopers urged to minimize the threat to seagrass.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - KY: Civil Rights

A 2016 poll found that about 70 percent of Kentuckians agree the capital-punishment system risks executing the innocent. (@annie29/Twenty20)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Thirty lawmakers from all sides of the political spectrum are co-sponsoring a bill to abolish the death penalty in Kentucky. While House Bill 115 languishes in the House Judiciary Committee, supporters say the high number of sponsors indicates views on capital punishment in

The Kentucky State Penitentiary complex in Eddyville, Ky., holds more than 850 people and has been in operation since the 1880s. (Wikimedia Commons)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Researchers are following 230 Kentuckians who either are incarcerated or have recently been released, as part of a national program designed to help people transition back into society after serving their time. By working with local corrections departments and community-base

Death-penalty opponents say not only does capital punishment cost more than a life sentence, a wrongful execution can't be reversed. (Jason Rosenberg/Flickr)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Conservatives historically are pegged as champions of the death penalty, but some say there's growing momentum to change that narrative. Hannah Cox, national manager of the group Conservatives Concerned About the Death Penalty, will make the conservative case against capital

It takes a partial pardon from the governor to restore voting rights to people in Kentucky with a felony conviction in their past. (quimono/Pixabay)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – They've paid their dues for mistakes of their past, however an estimated 300,000 Kentuckians are not allowed to cast a ballot on Election Day. Kentucky is one of four states that takes away the voting power of all people with a felony conviction for their entire lifetime.

FRANKFORT, Ky. – A leading civil rights group says a new effort to have the motto "In God We Trust" displayed in Kentucky's public schools is just the latest in a string of attempts to bring religion into the classroom. State Rep. Brandon Reed (R) of Hodgenville has pre-filed a bill that wou

Dozens of advocates from Kentucky are expected to join a global social justice rally in Washington  on Saturday. (Kentucky Poor People's Campaign)

FRANKFORT, Ky. — A 40-day social justice blitz in Kentucky wraps up today, but advocates say their work is far from over. The Kentucky Poor People's Campaign has held days of action in Frankfort the past six Mondays, joining groups in 30 other states in a National Call for Moral Revival. Spo

Ray Krone was sent to death row for a murder he did not commit. Since being exonerated, he's been working to abolish capital punishment. (Witness to Innocence)

PIKEVILLE, Ky. – An innocent man who spent 10 years behind bars in Arizona, including three on death row, brings his story to Kentucky this week – one of the 31 states where execution remains legal. In 2002, Ray Krone became the 100th person in the United States to be exonerated from d

The Lexington Fair Housing Council and the Kentucky Coalition Against Domestic Violence are offering free webinars about the new law. (Greg Stotelmyer)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Since June 29, new leasing protections have been in place in Kentucky for survivors of domestic, dating and sexual violence, as well as stalking. Now the focus is on training landlords on how the law impacts them. Art Crosby, executive director of the Lexington Fair Housin

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