Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - Friday, August 23, 2019 


A federal court ruling changes how the President is elected, and Florida Democrats trigger a special session vote on guns. Those stories and more in today's news.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - KY: Civil Rights

Kentucky Senate Judiciary Chair Whitney Westerfield is pushing legislation aimed at reducing disparities in how minority youth are treated by the juvenile-justice system. (LRC Public Information)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Legislation aimed at addressing the disparities in how Kentucky treats minority youth is on the Senate Judiciary Committee's agenda for Thursday. The Senate Judiciary chair Whitney Westerfield has filed Senate Bill 20 that he says will collect "consistent" data on age, gende

Saying it's about the soul of Kentucky, Rep. Jason Nemes is filing legislation to abolish the death penalty. (LRC Public Information)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Two chambers. Two lawmakers from different parties. Similar bills. Republican Representative Jason Nemes and Democrat Senator Gerald Neal are both filing legislation Tuesday in the Kentucky General Assembly to abolish the death penalty. Saying he wants to "stand for life," Ne

Kentuckians will be among the tens of thousands of people at Saturday's Women's March on Washington. (Sierra Club/SergeyIT/iStockphoto)

BOWLING GREEN, Ky. – Donald Trump will be greeted by a massive, grassroots human rights rally during his first full day in office as president this Saturday. The Women's March on Washington will draw people from across the country, including Kentucky. Stephanie Morris plans to make an over

Randy Steidl, who spent 12 years on death row in Illinois for a crime he did not commit, is in Kentucky this week making his plea for the state to abolish capital punishment. (Pat Delahanty)

PIKEVILLE, Ky. – He was innocent, but spent 12 years on death row in Illinois for a 1986 double murder. Eventually exonerated, Randy Steidl is now on a crusade to ban capital punishment. Over the next three nights Steidl will speak in Pikeville, Prestonsburg and Whitesburg. Three days in

An evolving debate continues over the future of the death penalty in Kentucky. (Morguefile)

EDGEWOOD, Ky. – Over the past 10 years, eight states have abolished or overturned their death penalties, while governors in four other states have issued moratoriums. So, is the tide turning in Kentucky, one of 30 states that still allows capital punishment? It has for Amy Carrino, who say

Juvenile justice reform has led to fewer Kentucky kids incarcerated in youth prisons. (Pixabay)

FRANKFORT, Ky. - Kentucky Justice and Public Safety Cabinet Secretary John Tilley said putting kids in a prison cell is not the answer most of the time. He said he agrees with a new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, which makes the case for closing youth prisons across the country because t

Nearly three out of four Kentuckians want executions halted in Kentucky until problems with the system are fixed according to a new poll. (Kentucky Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – A new poll finds that nearly three out of four Kentuckians want executions halted in the state until problems with the system are fixed – problems that were exposed in a 2011 report from the American Bar Association. The poll, conducted by the University of Kentucky Su

Renowned death penalty attorney and Kentucky native Stephen Bright says capital punishment is a decade or two from being eliminated in the U.S.. (Southern Center for Human Rights)

DANVILLE, Ky. – A Kentucky native who has helped overturn dozens of death sentences says it's inevitable that the death penalty will come to an end in the United States. The death penalty remains legal for now in 31 states including Kentucky, but attorney Stephen Bright says capital punishme

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