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PNS Daily Newscast - May 17, 2019 


West Coast immigrants' rights groups pan President Trump’s new immigration proposal as “elitist.” Also on the Friday rundown: Consumer advocates want stronger energy-efficiency standards. And we'll take you to a state that ranks near the bottom for senior mental health.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - KY: Criminal Justice

A patient gets his hand tattoo removed. (Adobe Stock)

COVINGTON, Ky. - A small nonprofit in Northern Kentucky is removing face, neck and hand tattoos for people starting a new life after serving time in prison. It all started several years ago when Jo Martin retired from a long corporate career and began tutoring GED subjects to people incarcerated at

A 2016 poll found that about 70 percent of Kentuckians agree the capital-punishment system risks executing the innocent. (@annie29/Twenty20)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Thirty lawmakers from all sides of the political spectrum are co-sponsoring a bill to abolish the death penalty in Kentucky. While House Bill 115 languishes in the House Judiciary Committee, supporters say the high number of sponsors indicates views on capital punishment in

The Kentucky State Penitentiary complex in Eddyville, Ky., holds more than 850 people and has been in operation since the 1880s. (Wikimedia Commons)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Researchers are following 230 Kentuckians who either are incarcerated or have recently been released, as part of a national program designed to help people transition back into society after serving their time. By working with local corrections departments and community-base

Kentuckians with felony convictions who have served their time are demanding the right to vote. (Kentuckians for the Commonwealth/Flickr)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – People with felonies in their past are rallying in Frankfort today, calling on Gov. Matt Bevin to return voting rights to people who have been convicted of felonies. More than 300,000 Kentuckians can't vote because of a felony conviction, according to the latest report from t

Death-penalty opponents say not only does capital punishment cost more than a life sentence, a wrongful execution can't be reversed. (Jason Rosenberg/Flickr)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Conservatives historically are pegged as champions of the death penalty, but some say there's growing momentum to change that narrative. Hannah Cox, national manager of the group Conservatives Concerned About the Death Penalty, will make the conservative case against capital

In 2018, 25 people were executed in the United States, a record low for the fourth year in a row.<br />(PublicDomainPictures/Pixabay)

FRANKFORT, Ky. - A bill that would end capital punishment is among the first items of business for Kentucky lawmakers who began their new session on Tuesday. House Bill 115 was introduced by Rep. Chad McCoy, R-Nelson. Aaron Bentley, who chairs the Kentucky Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, c

Eileen Rektenwald, who heads the Kentucky Association of Sexual Assault Programs, speaks at The Ending Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Conference in Lexington. (KCADV)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Kentucky advocates for sexual and domestic assault survivors are gathering in Lexington to reflect on their successes of the year, and examine what's needed in the future. The three-day Ending Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Conference wraps up today with special awards

There are at least 30 people on death row at the Kentucky State Penitentiary. (Midnight Believer/Flickr)

HAZARD, Ky. — Convicted of a crime he didn't commit, Gary Drinkard spent six years on death row before the truth was revealed. And today, he's in Kentucky to talk about his experience. Drinkard was sentenced to the death for a 1993 Alabama murder, and was eventually exonerated due to prosecu

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