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PNS Daily Newscast - February 17, 2020 


44 Americans infected, but not all show signs of coronavirus illness; and many NC counties declare themselves 'Second Amendment sanctuaries.'

2020Talks - February 17, 2020 


Nevada's experiment with early caucusing is underway until tomorrow. Some candidates plus some Nevada Culinary Workers Union Local 226 members oppose Medicare for All, but Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders defends it, with a study just published making the case for it.

Public News Service - MA: Consumer

The number of cost-burdened renter households jumped by nearly 300,000 between 2017 and 2018, according to a new report from Apartment List.

BOSTON – Nearly half of all renter households nationwide are now spending more than 30% of their income on rent, according to a new report by the online service Apartment List. According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, spending more than 30% of your income on housing

The signature fund-raising cocktails for Sipping for Sisterhood included Simone Biles and Amelia Earhart. (Sportello Boston/Instagram)

BOSTON – Patrons of a few Boston area bars are making some decisions that are a lot more important than “Shaken or stirred?" Local nightspots are raising money to help organizations like Planned Parenthood and The Yellowhammer Fund, in response to the restrictive abortion laws being pa

The MBTA has the second highest derailment rate of any transit system in the country. (Robert McConnell/Wikipedia)

BOSTON – Gov. Charlie Baker's plans to accelerate maintenance on the struggling MBTA are too little, too late, according to critics who say more is needed to address what they call a transportation crisis. Baker's plan comes after two MBTA trains derailed this month, making five derailments

Every New England state has seen higher rates of opioid overdose deaths than the U.S. average. (New England Public Policy Center)

BOSTON – A new report claims it isn't economic factors that have fueled high numbers of opioid overdoses in New England – but doctors who've been over-prescribing them. Looking into the impact of the opioid epidemic on the labor market, the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston found overdose

While people would pay a lot per month for digital services they now get for free, the implications of this for the economy are not clear. (LoboStudioHamburg/Pixabay)

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. – A new Massachusetts Institute of Technology study aims to capture how much people would pay for free online services like Facebook, Wikipedia, and YouTube. The researchers' premise is that because a country's Gross Domestic Product measures spending, it fails to include mu

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker's fiscal budget includes additional education spending, but not enough for many education activists. (Mass.gov)

BOSTON – Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker on Wednesday unveiled his proposed budget with a focus on education spending along with a companion bill. But school activists are pushing for significantly more funding. The 2020 fiscal budget includes more than $200 million in new state aid to ed

Inside courthouses such as this one in Boston, some are predicting a spike of litigation about the so-called “garden clause” in Massachusetts' new non-compete law. (Carol M. Highsmith/Public Domain Pictures)

BOSTON – Massachusetts now has one of the toughest laws restricting non-compete clauses in work contracts, and it looks as though they'll be a lot less common at businesses in the state. One reason is the so-called "garden leave," a unique part of the Commonwealth law. If workers sign a non-c

Advocates say undermining the ACA could lead to denial of coverage for pre-existing conditions. (vjohns1580/pixabay)

BOSTON – Tuesday, Sept. 4, is primary day in the Bay State, and the candidates who win a place on the November ballot could have a major impact on the future of health care. Republicans in Washington, D.C., continue to wage a relentless campaign to dismantle the Affordable Care Act, while ma

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