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PNS Daily Newscast - January 28, 2020 


Testimony could be in play at the Trump impeachment trial. And are less strict emission standards at odds with consumers?

2020Talks - January 28, 2020 


Voters talked about "electability." What does it really mean? Democratic candidates have varying approaches, from courting Obama to Trump voters to mobilizing as many voters as possible.

Public News Service - MA: Criminal Justice

In Isabelle Doerre-Torres' curriculum, students learn about El Salvador's civil war (1980-1992) that killed more than 75,000 people, and that the U.S. funneled more than $4.5 billion to the right-wing Salvadoran government in the name of fighting communism. (Wikipedia Commons)

By Anna-Cat Brigida Broadcast version by Laura Rosbrow-Telem Reporting for the YES! Magazine-Media-Commonwealth News Service Collaboration BOSTON -- In the summer of 2017, before her senior year of high school, Isabelle Doerre-Torres met Carlos,* a Salvadoran immigrant on the verge of deportation.

Every New England state has seen higher rates of opioid overdose deaths than the U.S. average. (New England Public Policy Center)

BOSTON – A new report claims it isn't economic factors that have fueled high numbers of opioid overdoses in New England – but doctors who've been over-prescribing them. Looking into the impact of the opioid epidemic on the labor market, the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston found overdose

Experts say in-person family visits with people who are in jail or prison help reduce recidivism. (Boardhead [CC BY-SA 3.0)]/Wikimedia Commons)

BOSTON – Maintaining contact with family is important to the wellbeing of people who are incarcerated, and a bill in the state legislature would ensure that in-person visits are protected. The visitation provision is part of a much larger criminal justice reform bill. According to Lucius Co

ICE officials have carried out enforcement actions in at least 24 Massachusetts courthouses. (U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement)

BOSTON – Civil-rights groups are asking the Commonwealth's highest court to stop federal immigration officials from arresting people at courthouses. Public records show that Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials have acted in at least two dozen state courthouses around Massachusetts.

Nine states and Washington D.C. have legalized recreational marijuana. (StayRegular/Pixabay)

BOSTON – A bill has been introduced in the legislature to keep those who follow the Bay State's law on marijuana use from being turned over to federal authorities. The bill, called "An Act relative to refusal of complicity", would prohibit local and state officials from using state resources

The state’s Cannabis Control Commission still plans to begin marijuana sales this year. (noexcusesradio/Pixabay.com)

BOSTON – The Trump administration is taking aim at states that have legalized marijuana. On Thursday, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced he is rescinding an Obama-era policy that discouraged prosecutors from enforcing federal marijuana laws in states that have legalized its sale for

Police and court officers now need more than just an ICE detainer to hold a person in custody, according to a ruling from the state's highest court. (Picssr/Flckr)

BOSTON – It is being called a setback for federal immigration agents. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court issued a ruling Monday that clarified what had been a murky issue for many local police departments. Laura Rotolo, counsel and community advocate for the ACLU of Massachusetts, says

Former state crime lab chemist Annie Dookhan has served her sentence for falsifying drug evidence, resulting in dismissal of nearly 24,000 cases. (Pinterest/Truth Kings)

BOSTON – It was big news when the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court last week dismissed more than 20,000 drug cases due to misconduct by a former chemist at the state crime lab, but local legal advocates warn the collateral damage will continue. Rahsaan Hall, racial justice director for A

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