Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 21, 2019 


Could the nation’s airports be the next pressure points in the government shutdown? Also on our Monday rundown: Calls go out to improve food safety; and a new report renews calls for solutions to Detroit’s water woes.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MD: Rural/Farming

Pumpkins for sale at Maryland stores are more likely to be trucked in from other states this year, as record rainfall squashed the pumpkin-growing season. (Grantbahk/Pixabay)

PARKVILLE, Md. – You may notice higher prices for pumpkins this Halloween. Some Maryland farmers are being forced to buy the popular gourds out of state after an unusually wet summer drowned this fall's pumpkin crop. Record rainfall – amounts of 55 to 70 inches in some Maryland counties

World Health Organization recommendations aim to help preserve the effectiveness of antibiotics in human medicine by reducing their unnecessary use in animals. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. -- Starting in January, Maryland becomes the second state in the nation to restrict the routine use of antibiotics in animals. The state's new Keep Antibiotics Effective Act will prohibit large farms from feeding healthy cattle, hogs and poultry antibiotics at low doses to promote g

Research has shown the same pesticides that are wiping out bees are impacting hummingbirds as well. (foe.org)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – As we enjoy the late-summer crops produced in this country and around the world, advocates are hoping everyone will take time to appreciate the little creatures that pollinated them. About three-quarters of the more than 240,000 species of the world's flowering plants rely o

Many chickens that are sold at the local feed store come from large factory farms. (cdc.gov)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - Nearly 1,000 people across the country have become ill this year from salmonella connected to backyard flocks of chickens, ducks and geese. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating 10 separate salmonella outbreaks that have affected people in 48 states - incl

Clean drinking water in several states is reliant on government funding for  Chesapeake Bay. (Fish and Wildlife Service)

BALTIMORE – Those who love Chesapeake Bay are hopeful this week that despite President Donald Trump's promise to cut funding this year to help protect the bay, lawmakers will refuse to do that. A subcommittee of the House Appropriations Committee is expected to include $60 million for the En

Grant money gets communities involved in keeping water flowing into Chesapeake Bay clean. (cbtrust.org)

BALTIMORE – More financial support for on the ground environmental restoration programs is on the way to Maryland counties that surround Chesapeake Bay. The Chesapeake Bay Trust has announced that grants are available. Jana Davis, the group’s executive director, says the money will g

Opposition is mounting to proposed mega-mergers of chemical companies. (foe.org)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – Nearly 325 organizations have signed a letter pressing new U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions to make sure the Justice Department does its job without political interference when it looks at a proposal to let Dow Chemical and DuPont, Monsanto and Bayer, and Syngenta and ChemC

Stormwater pollution in the Chesapeake Bay is harmful to wildlife. (USGS)

GAITHERSBURG, Md. - You can't always see pollution, and many times it comes from places you wouldn't expect. One major type of nitrogen pollution in the Chesapeake Bay continues to grow: untreated stormwater runoff from blacktop roofs and other hardened surfaces. Rain hits these roofs, then falls in

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