Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 22, 2018 


GOP leadership puts its efforts to fix immigration on hold. Also on the Friday rundown: Florida students take their gun control message to the Midwest; and a call for renewal of the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MD: Consumer Issues

Maryland Department of Corrections officials plan to step up screening of books coming into the system. (Pixabay)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – After inmate advocates objected to new restrictions, Maryland prison officials are allowing inmates to continue receiving book shipments from online retailers and directly from relatives. Public Safety and Correctional Services Secretary Stephen T. Moyer recently reversed th

Frederick's municipal wastewater treatment plant was one of 12 significant municipal sewage plants found to be releasing more nutrients into Maryland waters than is allowed under its National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit, according to the Environmental Integrity Project. (Potomac Riverkeeper Network)

FREDERICK, Md. – After around a decade of violations, Frederick will need to act quickly to suppress the amount of nutrients pouring into the Potomac River from the city's wastewater treatment plant. The Potomac Riverkeeper Network is suing the city, hoping to find out what Frederick’s

Munir Bahar, 36, founder of COR Health Institute, stands in front of four vacant row homes he reconstructed into a community martial arts and fitness facility dedicated to serving at-risk children living in East Baltimore. (COR Health Institute)

By Kevon Paynter Broadcast version by Trimmel Gomes Reporting for the YES! Magazine-Maryland News Connection Rasheed Aziz remembers visiting Baltimore in 2006. The empty, hollow buildings sprawled the entire block, he says. Buildings lacked roofs, doorways were boarded up, and tree limbs grew into

In 2017, Marylanders surrendered more than 2,500 pounds of drugs to bins at police barracks across the state. (Pixabay)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — A coalition of Maryland leaders and health care advocates have launched a statewide coalition focused on reducing the number of people becoming addicted or dying from opioid use. According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than 1,800 Marylanders died in 2016 from opio

Maryland joins California and more than 250 localities across the nation with laws to stop the sale of dogs and cats from puppy-mill breeders in pet stores. (Pixabay)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - Despite pushback from some pet-store owners, Gov. Larry Hogan has signed a bill banning retail pet stores from selling dogs and cats born in "puppy mills." Just before signing House Bill 1662, the governor cradled two puppies outside the Capitol, signaling his strong support for th

Completing a medical advance directive is also known as creating a

BALTIMORE -- Untimely or unexpected sickness or injuries can occur at any time. Now, Maryland AARP, the state Attorney General's Office and the Maryland Department of Aging are making sure citizens across the state can be as prepared as possible. As part of National Healthcare Decisions Day, those

Activities such as tree plantings and community cleanups are on the list of projects eligible for grant funding through the Chesapeake Bay Trust. (Ben Hyman/Pigtown Main Street)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – If you've got a great idea for how to clean up the environment and are in need of funding to bring that idea to life, you could be awarded up to $5,000 through the Chesapeake Bay Trust. The Trust's "Mini Grant Program for Community Engagement" hopes to award roughly $200,000 i

The signing of the Affordable Care Act enabled some 400,000 Marylanders to gain health insurance. (Pixabay)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – Supporters and opponents agree the groundbreaking federal Affordable Care Act is far from perfect, but those in favor are celebrating the eighth anniversary of millions gaining health coverage while pointing to simple fixes to make the plan better. On Friday, legislators, he

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