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PNS Daily Newscast - July 15, 2019 


AOC, Trump battle on Twitter over being native born. Also on our Monday rundown: Democratic hopefuls share views in five Iowa cities. Plus, efforts to control stormwater pollution are paying off for Puget Sound.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MO: Public Lands/Wilderness

The National Park Service says Gateway Arch National Park needs almost $25 million in repairs.(National Park Service)

INDEPENDENCE, Mo. — Hope is on the horizon to fix up our national parks, which have compiled almost $12 billion in deferred maintenance. On Wednesday, the House of Representatives' Committee on Natural Resources will discuss a bill to fund about half the repairs. The money would take care of

The sign, above, in the Ozark National Scenic Riverways should, but doesn't yet, mark the place where a motorized boat prohibition begins. (Marisa Frazier/Sierra Club Missouri Chapter)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Horsepower limits for motorized boats in the Ozark National Scenic Riverways have yet to be enforced more than four years after their approval. The Sierra Club Missouri Chapter says with the busy floating season here, it's time to put the rules in place. The National

The St. Charles County Council approved a housing development on the Missouri Bluffs last year. (Donald Rogers/Flickr)

ST. LOUIS – Opposition is growing to a proposed housing development on land owned by the University of Missouri that could disrupt popular outdoor destinations in the state. The proposed subdivision on the Missouri Bluffs would include approximately 275 units and be built next to the Weldon

After fulfilling a stipulation that the land be used only for research for 20 years, the University of Missouri gained the right to sell part of Missouri Bluffs that environmental groups want to preserve. (Twenty20/All Things)

WELDON SPRING, Mo. – The University of Missouri is caught in a tug-of-war between a developer and environmental groups wanting to preserve 400 acres of what they call ecologically fragile land. The university bought the forested land known as the Missouri River bluffs near Weldon Spring for

Legislators and the leadership of the Parks Division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources recently have suggested the sale of some of Missouri's newest state parks. (Jennifer Conner)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – In order to appreciate it, you've got to get out and experience it. At least, that's what outdoor enthusiasts are encouraging people to do over the holidays in hopes of saving three state parks from possible sale. The state's acquisition of Bryant Creek in Douglas Cou

Jay Nixon State Park was closed at the beginning of 2017, while the Eleven Point, Bryant Creek, and Ozark Mountain parks have never been opened. (Missouri State Parks)

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. – The Eleven Point, Bryant Creek, Ozark Mountain and Jay Nixon state parks face an uncertain future nearly 10 months into the administration of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens. Business owners and outdoor enthusiasts hope to change that with a signature drive calling attention t

Snakes, like the water moccasin, can easily be stepped on, causing them to strike. (FotoshopTofs/Pixabay)

ST. LOUIS – It's being called a byproduct of heavy rains in Missouri earlier this year - snake bites are on the rise. The state is home to five types of venomous snakes: copperhead, water moccasin, timber rattler, pygmy rattler and massasauga rattler. The most common is the copperhead. Jul

During the Dust Bowl years Missouri had the highest rate of soil erosion in the nation. (Missouri.gov)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - Advocates say all Missourians benefit from a tax that's been around since the 1980s. Back then, voters approved a one-tenth of one percent tax that is split between the Soil and Water Conservation District and the state park system. Last month Gov. Jay Nixon set the Novembe

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