Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 23, 2018 


A GOP Congressman and former FBI agent tells NPR he believes Trump was compromised by Putin. Also on the Monday rundown: a report on how trade wars could be risky business for the whiskey business: and the wealthiest Americans get richer as the wage gap widens.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MO: Civic Engagement

Vice President Mike Pence is in Missouri and Illinois on Thursday, campaigning for Republicans running in November. (Paul D. Williams/The White House)

ST. LOUIS – Protesters are turning out as Vice President Mike Pence attends a fundraiser in Missouri Thursday. Pence is speaking at an event promoting the Trump administration's tax cut and to raise money for Republican Josh Hawley, who is challenging U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill in the Novemb

There are currently 226,000 union members in Missouri, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. (Twenty20)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — On the surface, "right to work" policy sounds like something beneficial to Missouri workers, but opponents say it's a misnomer. Contrary to what the name may indicate, the policy does not aim to provide a general guarantee of employment to people seeking work. On August

The Rev. Cassandra Gould with the Clean Missouri initiative addresses the media Thursday, presenting the Secretary of State's office with more than 344,000 signature petitions. (Clean Missouri Initiative)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Volunteers in the Clean Missouri Initiative recently submitted nearly 347,000 signatures to the Secretary of State's office - more than double the amount needed to get their issues on a statewide ballot in November. The initiative's goal is to rid the state of corruptio

Thousands of students rally against gun violence at the Florida state Capitol in Tallahassee following the mass shooting that killed 17 at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.  (Trimmel Gomes)<br />

ST. LOUIS — Several universities across Missouri have said they will overlook disciplinary actions against any prospective student who is punished by his or her high school for participating in next week's national walkout to protest gun violence. The walkout comes a month after 17 people we

Cosmopolitan Park in Columbia was the location of choice for 10,000 people viewing Monday's solar eclipse. (Columbia Convention and Visitors Bureau)

COLUMBIA, Mo. - The city of Columbia is busy with post-eclipse calculations - not the astronomy, but the economic impact of this week's festivities on the area. Events linked to Monday's solar eclipse filled every hotel room in town on Sunday night and up to 70 percent of the lodging on Monday nigh

Marcellus Williams' 2014 mug shot, taken 15 years after his conviction for the death of Felicia Gayle. (Missouri Department of Corrections)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - Marcellus Williams was only a few hours from being executed Tuesday when Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens stepped in to issue a stay, citing new DNA evidence in Williams' capital murder case. Williams was convicted in the 1998 stabbing death of former St. Louis Post-Dispatch repor

Anthropologist Karen Stephenson says soft power or trust yields innovation in metropolitan areas such as Kansas City. (Jay Castor/Pixabay)

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – When you want to make substantive changes to your community and do meaningful work, it's natural to first seek out the most powerful people in town. But just concluded research from an anthropologist and data scientist suggests something different. Karen Stephenson spent

The co-author of

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – For many minorities, the recent events in Charlottesville, Va., and the response to them come as no surprise. Other Americans have interpreted the events as isolated and rare. A Midwest researcher is working to resolve the disconnect and provide tools to reduce inequality.

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